, Holder v. Hall :: 512 U.S. 874 (1994) :: US LAW US Supreme Court Center

Holder v. Hall :: 512 U.S. 874 (1994) :: US LAW US Supreme Court Center

    OCTOBER TERM, 1993

    Syllabus

    HOLDER, INDIVIDUALLY AND IN HIS OFFICIAL CAPACITY AS COUNTY COMMISSIONER FOR BLECKLEY COUNTY, GEORGIA, ET AL. v. HALL ET AL.

    CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT

    No. ninety one-2012. Argued October 4, 1993-Decided June 30, 1994

    Bleckley County, Georgia, has continually had a form of government wherein a single commissioner holds all legislative and government authority. In 1985, the country legislature authorized the county to adopt by means of referendum a multimember fee together with five individuals elected from single-member districts and a chair elected at huge, but voters defeated the concept, even though they'd formerly accepted a five-member district plan for the county school board. Respondents, black voters and the nearby chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, filed this movement. The District Court rejected their constitutional declare that the single-member fee was enacted or maintained with an rationale to exclude or restrict the political affect of the county s black network in violation of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. The courtroom also ruled in opposition to their claim that the fee s length violated § 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, locating that respondents glad best one of the three preconditions hooked up in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30. The Court of Appeals reversed on the statutory claim, maintaining that the totality of the situations supported § 2 legal responsibility and remanding for a components of a remedy, which it suggested might be modeled after the county s faculty board election gadget.

    Held: The judgment is reversed, and the case is remanded. 955 F.second 1563, reversed and remanded.

    JUSTICE KENNEDY, joined by means of THE CHIEF JUSTICE and JUSTICE O CONNOR, concluded in Parts I, II-A, and III:

    1. The length of a governing authority isn't always subject to a vote dilution venture under § 2. Along with figuring out whether the Gingles preconditions are met and whether or not the totality of the circumstances assist a legal responsibility locating, a court in a § 2 match must discover a reasonable opportunity practice as a benchmark against which to measure the present balloting practice. However, there is no goal and potential general for choosing a reasonable benchmark where, as right here, the venture is introduced to the authorities body s size. There is not any reason why one


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    size must be picked over another. Respondents have provided no convincing reasons why the benchmark have to be a hypothetical fivemember fee. That this type of commission is the maximum commonplace shape of governing authority inside the State does no longer undergo on dilution, considering a sole commissioner system has the same impact on balloting power whether or not it's miles shared via none, or by way of all, of Georgia s counties. That the county was legal to extend its commission, and that it followed a five-member faculty board, are likewise irrelevant issues. At most, they imply that the county should exchange the size of its governing frame with minimal disruption, however the failure to accomplish that says not anything about the effects the contemporary system has at the county citizens vote casting energy. Pp.880-882.

    2. The case is remanded for attention of respondents constitutional declare. P. 885.

    JUSTICE KENNEDY, joined by using THE CHIEF JUSTICE, concluded in Part II-B that a vote casting practice subject to the preclearance requirement of § 5 of the Act isn't necessarily situation to a dilution venture below § 2. The sections range in structure, reason, and alertness; and in evaluation to § 2 cases, a baseline for assessment beneath § 5 exists via definition: A proposed voting practice is measured in opposition to the prevailing exercise to determine whether or not retrogression might end result from the proposed alternate. pp. 882-885.

    JUSTICE O CONNOR concluded that precedent compels the conclusion that the dimensions of a governing authority is both a "widespread, practice, or procedure" underneath § 2 and a "preferred, exercise, or technique with admire to balloting" under § five, however agreed that a § 2 dilution mission to a governing authority s size can not be maintained due to the fact there can never be an goal alternative benchmark for contrast. Pp. 885-888.

    JUSTICE THOMAS, joined with the aid of JUSTICE SCALIA, concluded that the size of a governing frame can not be attacked under § 2 as it is not a "wellknown, exercise, or technique" in the terms of § 2. An exam of § 2 s textual content makes it clean that those phrases refer most effective to practices that have an effect on minority citizens get entry to to the poll. Districting systems and electoral mechanisms which could have an effect on the "weight" given to a poll duly forged and counted are actually beyond the purview of the Act. The choice in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30, which translates § 2 to reach claims of vote "dilution," ought to be overruled. Gingles changed into based totally upon a incorrect approach of statutory construction and has produced an interpretation of § 2 this is at odds with the textual content of the Act and that has proved unworkable in exercise. Pp. 891-946.

    KENNEDY, J., announced the judgment of the Court and added an opinion, in which REHNQUIST, C. J., joined, and in all however Part II-B of


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    Full Text of Opinion

    OCTOBER TERM, 1993

    Syllabus

    HOLDER, INDIVIDUALLY AND IN HIS OFFICIAL CAPACITY AS COUNTY COMMISSIONER FOR BLECKLEY COUNTY, GEORGIA, ET AL. v. HALL ET AL.

    CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT

    No. 91-2012. Argued October 4, 1993-Decided June 30, 1994

    Bleckley County, Georgia, has constantly had a shape of presidency wherein a single commissioner holds all legislative and government authority. In 1985, the state legislature legal the county to adopt by referendum a multimember fee along with five participants elected from unmarried-member districts and a chair elected at large, however voters defeated the notion, even though they'd formerly authorized a five-member district plan for the county college board. Respondents, black citizens and the local bankruptcy of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, filed this motion. The District Court rejected their constitutional claim that the single-member fee became enacted or maintained with an reason to exclude or limit the political have an effect on of the county s black network in violation of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. The court also dominated against their claim that the commission s length violated § 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, finding that respondents happy most effective one of the 3 preconditions mounted in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30. The Court of Appeals reversed at the statutory claim, protecting that the totality of the circumstances supported § 2 liability and remanding for a formulation of a remedy, which it counseled may be modeled after the county s faculty board election system.

    Held: The judgment is reversed, and the case is remanded. 955 F.second 1563, reversed and remanded.

    JUSTICE KENNEDY, joined by means of THE CHIEF JUSTICE and JUSTICE O CONNOR, concluded in Parts I, II-A, and III:

    1. The length of a governing authority isn't problem to a vote dilution mission underneath § 2. Along with figuring out whether the Gingles preconditions are met and whether or not the totality of the circumstances aid a legal responsibility finding, a courtroom in a § 2 match must discover a reasonable opportunity practice as a benchmark in opposition to which to degree the present voting exercise. However, there's no goal and achievable standard for choosing a reasonable benchmark where, as here, the undertaking is brought to the government frame s length. There isn't any purpose why one


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    length need to be picked over any other. Respondents have offered no convincing reasons why the benchmark have to be a hypothetical fivemember commission. That any such fee is the most common form of governing authority within the State does not bear on dilution, when you consider that a sole commissioner system has the identical effect on voting power whether it's far shared by way of none, or through all, of Georgia s counties. That the county became legal to make bigger its fee, and that it adopted a five-member school board, are likewise irrelevant considerations. At maximum, they indicate that the county may want to change the scale of its governing body with minimum disruption, but the failure to achieve this says nothing approximately the outcomes the contemporary system has at the county citizens vote casting power. Pp.880-882.

    2. The case is remanded for consideration of respondents constitutional declare. P. 885.

    JUSTICE KENNEDY, joined by way of THE CHIEF JUSTICE, concluded in Part II-B that a balloting exercise difficulty to the preclearance requirement of § five of the Act isn't necessarily situation to a dilution task below § 2. The sections range in structure, reason, and application; and in comparison to § 2 cases, a baseline for assessment underneath § 5 exists via definition: A proposed balloting practice is measured towards the present practice to decide whether or not retrogression might result from the proposed trade. pp. 882-885.

    JUSTICE O CONNOR concluded that precedent compels the belief that the size of a governing authority is both a "standard, practice, or system" below § 2 and a "general, practice, or method with appreciate to balloting" underneath § 5, however agreed that a § 2 dilution mission to a governing authority s length can not be maintained due to the fact there can by no means be an objective alternative benchmark for evaluation. Pp. 885-888.

    JUSTICE THOMAS, joined with the aid of JUSTICE SCALIA, concluded that the size of a governing frame cannot be attacked beneath § 2 because it isn't a "fashionable, practice, or process" in the terms of § 2. An exam of § 2 s text makes it clear that those terms refer most effective to practices that affect minority residents get right of entry to to the poll. Districting systems and electoral mechanisms which can have an effect on the "weight" given to a ballot duly forged and counted are truely past the purview of the Act. The selection in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30, which translates § 2 to reach claims of vote "dilution," should be overruled. Gingles changed into primarily based upon a wrong method of statutory production and has produced an interpretation of § 2 this is at odds with the textual content of the Act and that has proved unworkable in practice. Pp. 891-946.

    KENNEDY, J., announced the judgment of the Court and introduced an opinion, wherein REHNQUIST, C. J., joined, and in all but Part II-B of


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    Opinion of KENNEDY, J.

    which O CONNOR, J., joined. O CONNOR, J., filed an opinion concurring in element and concurring in the judgment, put up, p. 885. THOMAS, J., filed an opinion concurring in the judgment, wherein SCALIA, J., joined, post, p. 891. BLACKMUN, J., filed a dissenting opinion, in which STEVENS, SouTER, and GINSBURG, JJ., joined, publish, p. 946. GINSBURG, J., filed a dissenting opinion, put up, p. 956. STEVENS, J., filed a separate opinion, in which BLACKMUN, SOUTER, and GINSBURG, JJ., joined, publish, p. 957.

    R. Napier Murphy argued the motive for petitioners.

    With him on the briefs changed into W Lonnie Barlow.

    Christopher Coates argued the cause for respondents.

    With him at the short had been Laughlin McDonald, Kathleen Wilde, Neil Bradley, Mary Wyckoff, John A. Powell, and Steven R. Shapiro. *

    JUSTICE KENNEDY announced the judgment of the Court and added an opinion, wherein THE CHIEF JUSTICE joined, and in all but Part II-B of which JUSTICE O CONNOR joined.

    This case affords the question whether or not the scale of a governing authority is difficulty to a vote dilution undertaking below § 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, 42 U. S. C. § 1973.

    I

    The State of Georgia has 159 counties, one in all which is Bleckley County, a rural county in central Georgia. Black persons make up nearly 20% of the eligible vote casting populace in Bleckley County. Since its advent in 1912, the county has had a single-commissioner shape of presidency for the exercising of "county governing authority." See Ga. Code Ann. § 1-3-three(7) (Supp. 1993). Under this system, the

    *Briefs of amici curiae urging affirmance were filed for the United States by means of Acting Solicitor General Bryson, Acting Assistant Lawyer General Turner, Acting Deputy Solicitor General Kneedler, Michael R. Dreeben, and Dennis J. Dimsey; and for the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law by Antonia B. Ianniello, Herbert M. Wachtell, William H. Brown III, Norman Redlich, Thomas J. Henderson, Frank R. Parker, and Brenda Wright.


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    Bleckley County Commissioner plays all of the govt and legislative capabilities of the county authorities, along with the levying of widespread and special taxes, the directing and controlling of all county property, and the settling of all claims. Ga. Code Ann. § 36-5-22.1 (1993). In addition to Bleckley County, about 10 different Georgia counties use the single-commissioner system; the relaxation have multimember commissions.

    In 1985, the Georgia Legislature authorized Bleckley County to adopt a multimember commission which include five commissioners elected from single-member districts and a single chairman elected at huge. 1985 Ga. Laws, p. 4406. In a referendum held in 1986, however, the voters did no longer undertake the trade to a multimember fee. (In a similar referendum four years earlier, county voters had accredited a 5-member district plan for the election of the county school board.)

    In 1985, respondents (six black registered voters from Bleckley County and the CochranlBleckley County Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) challenged the unmarried-commissioner device in a fit filed in opposition to petitioners (Jackie Holder, the incumbent county commissioner, and Probate Judge Robert Johnson, the superintendent of elections). The criticism raised each a constitutional and a statutory claim.

    In their constitutional claim, respondents alleged that the county s single-member commission turned into enacted or maintained with an rationale to exclude or to restriction the political affect of the county s black network in violation of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. At the outset, the District Court made considerable findings of reality approximately the political history and dynamics of Bleckley County. The court docket found, as an example, that after the county turned into fashioned in 1912, few, if any, black citizens should vote. Indeed, till passage of federal civil rights legal guidelines, Bleckley County "enforced racial segregation in all elements of local government-courthouse,


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    jails, public housing, governmental offerings-and deprived its black citizens of the opportunity to take part in nearby authorities." 757 F. Supp. 1560, 1562 (MD Ga. 1991). And even today, even though prison segregation no longer exists, "greater black than white citizens of Bleckley County hold to bear a depressed socio-economic fame." Ibid. No black individual has run for or been elected to the office of Bleckley County Commissioner, and the District Judge said that, having run for public workplace himself, he "wouldn t run if [he] were black in Bleckley [C]ounty." See 955 F.second 1563, 1571 (CAll 1992).

    The courtroom rejected respondents constitutional contention, but, concluding that respondents "ha[d] did not provide any evidence that Bleckley County s single member county commission [wa]s the product of unique or persisted racial animus or discriminatory rationale." 757 F. Supp., at 1571. Nor was there evidence that the gadget changed into maintained "for tenuous motives" or that the commissioner himself became unresponsive to the "particularized needs" of the black community. Id., at 1564. There became no "slating process" to stand as a barrier to black candidates, and there was testimony from respondents that they had been ignorant of any racial appeals in latest elections. Id., at 1562, n. 2, 1583.

    In their statutory claim, respondents asserted that the county s single-member fee violated § 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, 79 Stat. 437, as amended, 42 U. S. C. § 1973. Under the statute, the in shape contended, Bleckley County need to have a county fee of enough size that, with unmarried-member election districts, the county s black citizens could constitute a majority in one of the single-member districts. Applying the § 2 framework installed in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30 (1986), the District Court determined that respondents happy the first of the 3 Gingles preconditions because black citizens were sufficiently severa and compact that they might have constituted a majority in one district of a multimember fee. In specific,


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    the District Court found that "[i]f the county commission had been accelerated in wide variety to 6 commissioners to be elected from five single member districts and if the districts were similar to the existing college board election districts, a black majority secure district ... might end result." 757 F. Supp., at 1565. The court docket observed, however, that respondents failed to satisfy the second one and 0.33 Gingles preconditions-that whites vote as a bloc in a manner enough to defeat the black-preferred candidate and that blacks have been politically cohesive.

    The Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit reversed at the statutory declare. Relying on its choice in Carrollton Branch of NAACP v. Stallings, 829 F.2d 1547 (1987), the courtroom first held that a assignment to the unmarried-commissioner device turned into challenge to the equal analysis as that used in Gingles. Applying that evaluation, the Court of Appeals agreed with the District Court that respondents had happy the primary Gingles precondition via displaying that blacks should represent a majority of the citizens in considered one of 5 singlemember districts. The courtroom explained that it became "suitable to bear in mind the dimensions and geographical compactness of the minority institution within a restructured shape of the challenged gadget whilst the existing structure is being challenged as dilutive." 955 F. 2nd, at 1569. The Court of Appeals further observed that the District Court had erred in concluding that the second and 1/3 Gingles preconditions have been now not met. Turning to the totality of the situations, the court docket determined that those occasions supported a locating of legal responsibility under § 2. The court consequently concluded that respondents had proved a violation of § 2, and it remanded for method of a remedy, which, it recommended, "should nicely be modeled" after the device used to decide on the Bleckley County school board. 955 F. second, at 1573-1574, and n. 20. Because of its statutory ruling, the Court of Appeals did no longer don't forget the District Court s ruling on respondents constitutional claim.


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    Opinion of KENNEDY, J.

    We granted certiorari to review the statutory maintaining of the Court of Appeals. 507 U. S. 959 (1993).

    II A

    Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 affords that "[n]o vote casting qualification or prerequisite to balloting, or standard, exercise, or process shall be imposed or implemented by using any State or political subdivision in a manner which results in a denial or abridgement of the right of any citizen of the US to vote resulting from race or coloration." 42 U. S. C. § 1973(a). In a § 2 vote dilution fit, at the side of determining whether or not the Gingles preconditions are met 1 and whether the totality of the circumstances supports a finding of liability, a court docket need to discover a affordable opportunity exercise as a benchmark towards which to degree the prevailing voting exercise. See publish, at 887 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in element and concurring in judgment). As JUSTICE O CONNOR explained in Gingles: "The word vote dilution itself shows a norm with recognize to which the reality of dilution may be ascertained .... [I]n order to determine whether or not an electoral device has made it tougher for minority citizens to elect the applicants they decide upon, a court docket should have an idea in mind of how difficult it must be for minority citizens to opt for their favored candidates below an acceptable system." 478 U. S., at 88 (opinion concurring in judgment) (inner quotation marks left out).

    In certain instances, the benchmark for assessment in a § 2 dilution in shape is plain. The effect of an anti-unmarried-shot voting rule, for example, may be evaluated by using comparing the

    1 Gingles calls for a displaying that "the minority institution ... is satisfactorily big and geographically compact to constitute a majority in a singlemember district," 478 U. S., at 50, that the minority institution is politically cohesive, and that the majority group "votes sufficiently as a bloc to allow it-in the absence of special situations ... typically to defeat the minority s desired candidate," identity., at 51.


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    machine with that rule to the device with out that rule. But where there's no objective and manageable wellknown for selecting a reasonable benchmark via which to evaluate a challenged vote casting practice, it follows that the vote casting exercise cannot be challenged as dilutive below § 2. See put up, at 887-891 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in element and concurring in judgment).

    As the facts of this case well illustrate, the search for a benchmark is pretty complex whilst a § 2 dilution assignment is introduced to the scale of a government frame. There isn't any principled reason why one length need to be picked over another because the benchmark for evaluation. Respondents right here argue that we ought to evaluate Bleckley County s sole commissioner device to a hypothetical 5-member commission to be able to determine whether or not the modern device is dilutive. Respondents and america as amicus curiae deliver 3 motives why the unmarried-commissioner structure should be compared to a 5-member commission (in place of, say, a 3-, 10-, or 15-member frame): (1) because the 5-member commission is a not unusual form of governing authority in the State; (2) due to the fact the nation legislature had legal Bleckley County to adopt a five-member fee if it so selected (it did no longer); and (three) because the county had moved from a unmarried superintendent of schooling to a college board with 5 individuals elected from single-member districts. See Brief for United States as Amicus Curiae 17-18.

    These referents do now not undergo upon dilution. It does not be counted, for example, how popular the unmarried-member fee system is in Georgia in determining whether it dilutes the vote of a minority racial organization in Bleckley County. That the single-member fee is unusual in the State of Georgia, or that a five-member fee is quite common, tells us nothing approximately its consequences on a minority institution s voting power. The sole commissioner device has the equal effect regardless of whether or not it is shared through none, or with the aid of all, of the opposite counties in Georgia. It makes little


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    sense to say (as do respondents and the USA) that the sole commissioner machine have to be situation to a dilution task if it's far rare-however immune if it is commonplace.

    That Bleckley County become legal via the State to extend its commission, and that it adopted a 5-member faculty board, are likewise inappropriate concerns inside the dilution inquiry. At most, the ones records imply that Bleckley County should change the scale of its commission with minimum disruption. But the county s failure to accomplish that says nothing about the results the only commissioner machine has on the vote casting electricity of Bleckley County s residents. Surely a minority institution s balloting electricity could be no extra or much less diluted had the State now not legal the county to adjust the size of its commission, or had the county no longer enlarged its college board. One receives the feel that respondents and america have chosen a benchmark for the sake of getting a benchmark. But it is one element to say that a benchmark can be found, quite another to present a powerful purpose for finding it in the first area.

    B

    To bolster their argument, respondents factor out that our § five instances can be interpreted to signify that blanketed jurisdictions won't exchange the scale in their government bodies without obtaining preclearance from the Lawyer General or the federal courts. Brief for Respondents 29; see Presley v. Etowah County Comm n, 502 U. S. 491, 501-503 (1992); City of Lockhart v. United States, 460 U. S. a hundred twenty five, 131-132 (1983); City of Rome v. United States, 446 U. S. 156, 161 (1980). Respondents contend that these § five cases, together with the similarity in language among §§ 2 and five of the Act, compel the realization that the scale of a central authority body ought to be concern to a dilution challenge below § 2. It is genuine that during Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380, 401-402 (1991), we stated that the coverage of §§ 2 and 5 is presumed to be the equal (at least if differential coverage could be anomalous). We did not adopt a conclusive rule to that impact, however,


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    and we do not suppose that the truth that a change in a balloting practice need to be precleared below § 5 necessarily approach that the voting practice is challenge to mission in a dilution suit beneath §2.

    To make certain, if the shape and cause of § 2 mirrored that of § 5, then the case for deciphering §§ 2 and 5 to have the same software in all instances could be convincing. But the 2 sections fluctuate in structure, motive, and alertness.2 Section 5 applies most effective in certain jurisdictions unique by means of Congress and "only to proposed modifications in voting strategies." Beer v. United States, 425 U. S. 130, 138 (1976); see forty two U. S. C. § 1973b(b) (specifying jurisdictions in which § five applies). In those covered jurisdictions, a proposed change in a vote casting exercise must be authorized in advance by means of the Lawyer General or the federal courts. § 1973c. The motive of this requirement "has always been to insure that no balloting-process adjustments could be made that might lead to a retrogression within the position of racial minorities with respect to their powerful workout of the electoral franchise." 425 U. S., at 141. Under § 5, then, the proposed vote casting exercise is measured towards the existing balloting exercise to determine whether or not retrogression could end result from the proposed exchange. See ibid. The baseline for assessment is gift with the aid of definition; it's far the existing status. While there can be issue in determining whether a seasoned-

    2 Section 2 provides that "[n]o balloting qualification or prerequisite to balloting or trendy, practice, or technique shall be imposed or implemented by any State or political subdivision in a way which leads to a denial or abridgement of the proper of any citizen of the USA to vote resulting from race or colour." forty two U. S. C. § 1973(a).

    Section five requires preclearance approval by means of a court docket or through the Lawyer General "[w]henever a [covered] State or political subdivision ... shall enact or seek to administer any balloting qualification or prerequisite to vote casting, or widespread, exercise, or system with admire to balloting ... distinctive from that [previously] in pressure or effect" as a way to make certain that it "does not have the motive and could now not have the effect of denying or abridging the proper to vote on account of race or colour .... " 42 U. S. C. § 1973c.


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    posed change might motive retrogression, there may be little difficulty in discerning the two voting practices to evaluate to decide whether or not retrogression could arise. See 28 CFR § fifty one.fifty four(b) (1993).

    Retrogression isn't the inquiry in § 2 dilution cases. forty two U. S. C. § 1973(a) (whether balloting practice "results in a denial or abridgement of the right of any citizen of the US to vote resulting from race or color"); S. Rep. No. 97417, p. 68, n. 224 (1982) ("Plaintiffs could not set up a Section 2 violation merely via displaying that a challenged reapportionment or annexation, as an instance, involved a retrogressive impact at the political electricity of a minority institution"). Unlike in § five instances, consequently, a benchmark does now not exist through definition in § 2 dilution cases. And as defined above, with a few voting practices, there in reality can be no appropriate benchmark to decide if an present balloting practice is dilutive under § 2. For that motive, a balloting exercise that is issue to the preclearance requirements of § 5 is not always issue to a dilution assignment below § 2.

    This conclusion is pretty unremarkable. For instance, in Perkins v. Matthews, four hundred U. S. 379, 388 (1971), we held that a town s annexation ofland changed into blanketed under § 5. Notwithstanding that maintaining, we suppose it pretty unbelievable to indicate that a § 2 dilution venture can be introduced to a city s existing political limitations (in an try to force it to annex surrounding land) by way of arguing that the contemporary barriers dilute a racial institution s balloting electricity in contrast to the proposed new boundaries. Likewise, in McCain v. Lybrand, 465 U. S. 236 (1984), we indicated that a trade from an appointive to an elected workplace become included underneath § 5. Here, again, we doubt Congress pondered that a racial organization could carry a § 2 dilution assignment to an appointive workplace (in an try to force a alternate to an non-obligatory workplace) through arguing that the appointive workplace diluted its balloting electricity in evaluation to the proposed non-compulsory workplace. We suppose those examples serve to show that a voting practice is


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    now not necessarily concern to a dilution venture under § 2 even if a trade in that vote casting practice might be situation to the preclearance requirements of § 5.

    III

    With respect to demanding situations to the dimensions of a governing authority, respondents fail to provide an explanation for in which the look for affordable opportunity benchmarks should start and quit, and that they offer no suitable standards for deciding future instances. The wide range of possibilities makes the selection "inherently standardless," submit, at 889 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in element and concurring in judgment), and we consequently finish that a plaintiff can't maintain a § 2 task to the size of a government frame, including the Bleckley County Commission. The judgment of the Court of Appeals is reversed, and the case is remanded for attention of respondents constitutional declare.

    It is so ordered.

    JUSTICE O CONNOR, concurring in component and concurring within the judgment.

    I agree with JUSTICES KENNEDY and THOMAS that a plaintiff can't maintain a § 2 vote dilution assignment to the dimensions of a governing authority, though I attain that end via a quite specific rationale. JUSTICE THOMAS rejects the perception that § 2 covers any dilution challenges, and could hold that § 2 is restrained to "country enactments that adjust residents get admission to to the ballot or the methods for counting a poll." Post, at 945. As JUSTICE STEVENS factors out, however, stare decisis issues weigh closely right here. Post, at 963-966 (opinion of STEVENS, J.); see additionally Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30, eighty four (1986) (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) ("We understand that Congress meant to permit vote dilution claims to be brought beneath § 2"); id., at 87 ("I believe the Court that proof of vote dilution can set up a contravention of § 2"). These issues require me to reject JUSTICE


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    THOMAS inspiration that we overhaul our established reading of §2.

    I also believe JUSTICE BLACKMUN, see post, at 946950, that our precedents compel the belief that the size of the Bleckley County Commission is each a "fashionable, practice, or technique" under § 2 and a "fashionable, exercise, or process with respect to balloting" underneath § five. See, e. g., Presley v. Etowah County Comm n, 502 U. S. 491, 503 (1992) (trade in length is a alternate in a "wellknown, practice, or process" due to the fact the change "increase[s] or decrease[es] the number of officers for whom the voters may additionally vote"); City of Lockhart v. United States, 460 U. S. 125, 131-132 (1983) (trade from 3-member fee to 5-member fee is problem to § five preclearance); City of Rome v. United States, 446 U. S. 156, 160-161 (1980) (it "is not disputed" that an expansion within the size of a board of training is situation to § five preclearance); Bunton v. Patterson, determined with Allen v. State Bd. of Elections, 393 U. S. 544, 569-571 (1969) (trade from elected to appointed workplace is challenge to § five preclearance); id., at 566-567 (§ 2 need to be given "the broadest feasible scope").

    As JUSTICES KENNEDY and BLACKMUN each recognize, in these instances we've got always stated that a change in size is a "popular, exercise, or system with appreciate to voting" that is challenge to § five preclearance. See ante, at 882 (opinion of KENNEDY, J.); submit, at 946-948 (BLACKMUN, J., dissenting). And though our instances regarding size have concerned § five, I do no longer suppose it feasible to study the phrases of § 2 greater narrowly than the terms of § five. Section 2 covers any "trendy, practice, or procedure," whilst § 5 covers any "popular, practice, or system with recognize to balloting." As a textual matter, I cannot see how a practice may be a "wellknown, exercise, or manner with admire to voting," but no longer be a "preferred, exercise, or method." Indeed, the similarity in language caused our end in Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380,


    887

    401-402 (1991), that, at least for figuring out threshold coverage, §§ 2 and 5 have parallel scope.

    But figuring out the edge scope of coverage does no longer stop the inquiry, as a minimum thus far as § 2 dilution challenges are involved. As JUSTICES KENNEDY and BLACKMUN agree, the truth that the scale of a governing authority is a "wellknown, practice, or system" does not answer the query whether or not respondents may additionally hold a § 2 vote dilution task. See ante, at 880 (opinion of KENNEDY, J.); submit, at 951 (BLACKMUN, J., dissenting). Section 2 vote dilution plaintiffs should establish that the challenged exercise is dilutive. In order for an electoral device to dilute a minority institution s voting power, there have to be an alternative machine that could provide greater electoral opportunity to minority voters. "Put actually, with a purpose to determine whether or not an electoral device has made it more difficult for minority voters to go with the applicants they decide on, a court should have an concept in mind of how hard it ought to be for minority citizens to opt for their desired candidates underneath an acceptable machine." Gingles, 478 U. S., at 88 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment). As we've stated, "[u]nless minority voters possess the capacity to elect representatives within the absence of the challenged structure or practice, they cannot declare to have been injured through that shape or practice." Id., at 50, n. 17 (emphasis in original); see also identification., at 99 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) ("[T]he relative lack of minority electoral success under a challenged plan, whilst as compared with the achievement that would be expected underneath the measure of undiluted minority balloting energy the courtroom is using, can represent effective evidence of vote dilution") (emphasis brought).

    Accordingly, to decide whether or not citizens possess the potential to decide on representatives of desire in the absence of the challenged shape, courts need to pick an objectively reasonable alternative exercise as a benchmark for the dilution contrast. On this, there may be trendy agreement. See ante, at 880 (opinion of KENNEDY, J.) ("[A] court docket ought to discover a


    888

    Opinion of O CONNOR, J.

    reasonable alternative practice as a benchmark in opposition to which to measure the present balloting exercise"); submit, at 951 (BLACKMUN, J., dissenting) ("[T]he allegedly dilutive mechanism should be measured towards the benchmark of an opportunity structure or exercise that is affordable and viable below the information of the unique case"). We require preclearance of changes in size below § 5, due to the fact in a § five case the question of an opportunity benchmark never arises-the benchmark is sincerely the previous practice hired by the jurisdiction searching for approval of a alternate. See ante, at 883 (opinion of KENNEDY, J.).

    But § 2 dilution demanding situations improve extra difficult questions.

    This case presents the query whether or not, in a § 2 dilution mission to length, there can ever be an objective opportunity benchmark for evaluation. And I believe JUSTICE KENNEDY that there can not be. As JUSTICE KENNEDY factors out, ante, at 880, the alternative benchmark is often self-evident. In a challenge to a multimember at-huge gadget, for instance, a court may also evaluate it to a machine of more than one single-member districts. See Gingles, supra, at 38, 50; Davidson, Minority Vote Dilution: An Overview, in Minority Vote Dilution 5 (C. Davidson ed. 1984). Similarly, a court docket may additionally assess the dilutive effect of majority vote necessities, numbered posts, staggered phrases, residency requirements, or anti-unmarried-shot policies through comparing the election outcomes underneath a gadget with the challenged exercise to the effects under a system with out the challenged exercise. Cf. City of Rome, supra, at 183-185; U. S. Comm n on Civil Rights, The Voting Rights Act: Ten Years After, pp. 206-208 (1975); Note, Application of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act to Runoff Primary Election Laws, 91 Colum. L. Rev. 1127, 1148 (1991). Though there can be disagreements about the precise appropriate opportunity exercise in these cases, see Gingles, supra, at 88-89 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment), there are at least a few objectively determinable constraints at the dilution inquiry.


    889

    This isn't so with § 2 dilution challenges to size, however.

    In a dilution assignment to the size of a governing authority, deciding on the opportunity for evaluation-a hypothetical larger (or smaller) governing authority-is extremely elaborate. See ante, at 881-882 (opinion of KENNEDY, J.). The wide variety of possibilities makes the choice inherently standardless. Here, as an example, respondents argued that the unmarried-member commission structure turned into dilutive in assessment to a five-member shape, wherein AfricanAmericans might in all likelihood have been able to go with one consultant in their desire. Some corporations, but, will no longer be capable of represent a majority in one in every of 5 districts. Once a courtroom accepts respondents reasoning, it's going to must allow a plaintiff organization insufficiently huge or geographically compact to form a majority in certainly one of 5 districts to argue that the jurisdiction s failure to set up a ten-, 15-, or 25commissioner structure is dilutive. See, e. g., Romero v. Pomona, 883 F.2d 1418, 1425, n. 10 (CA9 1989); Heath, Managing the Political Thicket: Developing Objective Standards in Voting Rights Litigation, 21 Stetson L. Rev. 819, 827 (1992) ("[O]nce one departs from the modern-day quantity of districts or other goal wellknown, the test loses its validity as a threshold fashionable").

    Respondents argue that this difficulty with arbitrary and standardless intrusions into the scale of nearby governing authority is overstated. Respondents essential support for this end is that a five-member fee is the maximum commonplace size for Georgia. But a 5-member fee is not the only not unusual length in Georgia: 22 Georgia counties have three-member commissions (and one county has an 11member commission). Moreover, there may be no true purpose why the search for benchmarks must be restrained to Georgia. Expanding the search nationwide produces many 20-individual county commissions in Tennessee, and forty-member commissions in Wisconsin. DeSantis, County Government: A Century of Change, in The Municipal Yearbook 1989, pp. 80, eighty three.


    890

    Opinion of O CONNOR, J.

    In sum, respondents do now not provide an explanation for how commonplace an alternative exercise have to be earlier than it is able to be a reliable opportunity benchmark for the dilution contrast, nor do they give an explanation for where the search for alternative benchmarks must begin and stop.

    Respondents failure to offer any significant ideas for deciding destiny cases demonstrates the difficulty with permitting dilution challenges to the size of a governing authority. Under respondents open-ended take a look at, a wide range of country governmental our bodies can be concern to a dilution mission. Within each State there are many types of authorities, together with county commissions that variety dramatically in length. For instance, the majority of county commissions in New Jersey have seven participants, however 3 counties have smaller commissions and one has a larger fee. Id., at seventy six. Similarly, in South Carolina the norm is a sevenmember fee, but some of counties deviate. Id., at seventy nine. In Tennessee, the average length for a county commission is 19 individuals, however one county has as few as nine and some other has as many as 40. Id., at 80. And in Wisconsin the common size is 27 participants, but the commission sizes variety from 7 to forty six. Id., at 83.

    Nor are deviations from the norm restrained to counties.

    Statewide governing government also variety dramatically in size, and often do no longer correlate to the dimensions of the State. For instance, Texas has handiest 31 contributors in its State Senate, even as tiny Rhode Island has 50. Council of State Governments, State Elective Officials and the Legislatures 1993-ninety four, p. vi. The Texas Senate is smaller than the country wide average and the Rhode Island Senate is larger. Similarly, California has an unusually small eighty-man or woman Assembly, while New Hampshire has a four hundred-individual House. Ibid.

    The discrepancies in size amongst country and neighborhood governing government support my problem that the restricting precept provided by using respondents will in practice restrict very little. Though respondents purport to present Bleckley County as


    891

    unique, it isn't. County commissions during New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin, and the state legislatures of Texas, Rhode Island, California, and New Hampshire are ripe for a dilution assignment under respondents theory, considering that they do not healthy the norm for his or her State. Moreover, though my examples are a number of the extra intense ones, they may be not by myself. In these instances, and possibly in lots of more, the capability reach of permitting dilution demanding situations to size will now not be meaningfully circumscribed with the aid of the open-ended requirement that the opportunity benchmark be "affordable and doable." Post, at 951 (BLACKMUN, J., dissenting).

    For these reasons, I concur within the conclusion that respondents dilution challenge to the dimensions of the Bleckley County Commission cannot be maintained beneath § 2 of the Voting Rights Act, and I join Parts I, II-A, and III of JUSTICE KENNEDY S opinion. Because the Court accurately reverses the judgment beneath and remands for consideration of respondents constitutional claim of intentional discrimination, I also concur inside the judgment.

    JUSTICE THOMAS, with whom JUSTICE SCALIA joins, concurring inside the judgment.

    We are asked in this example to decide whether the size of a local governing frame is concern to mission below § 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 as a "dilutive" exercise. While I consider JUSTICES KENNEDY and O CONNOR that the scale of a governing body can not be attacked beneath § 2, I do not percentage their motives for attaining that conclusion. JUSTICE KENNEDY persuasively demonstrates that there may be no principled approach for figuring out a benchmark towards which the dimensions of a governing body might be in comparison to determine whether it dilutes a group s vote casting power. Both he and JUSTICE O CONNOR rely upon that consideration to finish that length cannot be challenged underneath § 2 of the Act. See ante, at 880-882, 885 (opinion of KENNEDY, J.);


    892

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    ante, at 888-891 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in component and concurring in judgment).

    While the practical concerns JUSTICES KENNEDY and O CONNOR factor out can inform a right construction of the Act, I might explicitly anchor analysis in this case within the statutory textual content. Only a "balloting qualification or prerequisite to balloting, or fashionable, exercise, or procedure" can be challenged below § 2. I would hold that the size of a governing frame isn't always a "trendy, practice, or technique" inside the terms of the Act. In my view, however, the handiest precept restricting the scope of the phrases "trendy, exercise, or system" that can be derived from the text of the Act might exclude, not best the mission to size advanced these days, but also challenges to allegedly dilutive election strategies that we have considered within the scope of the Act within the beyond.

    I believe that a systematic reassessment of our interpretation of § 2 is needed in this case. The vast attain we've got given the segment would possibly advise that the scale of a governing body, like an election technique that has the capability for diluting the vote of a minority institution, must come in the phrases of the Act. But the gloss we've located at the words "general, exercise, or method" in cases alleging dilution is at odds with the phrases of the statute and has proved thoroughly unworkable in practice. A assessment of the contemporary kingdom of our instances suggests that via construing the Act to cowl potentially dilutive electoral mechanisms, we've got immersed the federal courts in a hopeless challenge of weighing questions of political concept-questions judges must confront to establish a benchmark concept of an "undiluted" vote. Worse, in pursuing the correct measure of balloting energy, we've devised a remedial mechanism that encourages federal courts to segregate voters into racially unique districts to make sure minority electoral achievement. In doing so, we've got collaborated in what may aptly be termed the racial "balkaniz[ation]" of the Nation. Shaw v. Reno, 509 U. S. 630, 658 (1993).


    893

    I can now not adhere to a reading of the Act that doesn't comport with the phrases of the statute and that has produced this type of disastrous misadventure in judicial policymaking. I would preserve that the scale of a government body isn't always a "popular, exercise, or system" due to the fact, nicely understood, the ones terms reach best country enactments that restriction residents get entry to to the poll.

    I

    If one surveys the records of the Voting Rights Act, forty two U. S. C. § 1973 et seq., you'll simplest be struck through the ocean alternate that has took place in the software and enforcement of the Act since it became surpassed in 1965. The statute turned into at the start perceived as a remedial provision directed especially at removing discriminatory practices that restrained blacks potential to sign up and vote inside the segregated South. Now, the Act has grown into some thing absolutely extraordinary. In construing the Act to cover claims of vote dilution, we've converted the Act right into a device for regulating, rationing, and apportioning political strength among racial and ethnic companies. In the method, we've read the Act basically as a provide of authority to the federal judiciary to increase theories on simple standards of representative government, for it's miles simplest a inn to political concept that could enable a court docket to determine which electoral structures offer the "fairest" degrees of illustration or the most "effective" or "undiluted" votes to minorities.

    Before I flip to an analysis of the text of § 2 to provide an explanation for why, for my part, the terms of the statute do now not authorize the project that we've got undertaken in the name of the Act, I intend first without a doubt to explain the improvement of the simple contours of vote dilution movements under the Voting Rights Act.1 An examination of the contemporary kingdom of our selections

    1 Of path, the various fundamental ideas I will speak are equally applicable to constitutional vote dilution cases. Indeed, prior to the amendment of the Voting Rights Act in 1982, dilution claims typically had been


    894

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    should make obvious a simple fact that for some distance too lengthy has gone unmentioned: Vote dilution cases have required the federal courts to make selections primarily based on fantastically political judgments-judgments that courts are inherently sick-prepared to make. A clear know-how of the damaging assumptions that have evolved to guide vote dilution selections and the position we've given the federal courts in redrawing the political panorama of the Nation have to make clean the urgent need for us to reconsider our interpretation of the Act.

    A

    As it turned into enforced within the years without delay following its enactment, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Pub. L. 89-110,79 Stat. 437, become perceived mostly as rules directed at disposing of literacy exams and similar devices that were used to prevent black voter registration within the segregated South. See A. Thernstrom, Whose Votes Count? Affirmative Action and Minority Voting Rights 17-27 (1987) (hereinafter Thernstrom). See additionally Guinier, The Representation of Minority Interests: The Question of Single-has membership Districts, 14 Cardozo L. Rev. 1135, 1151 (1993) (regarding actions securing get right of entry to to the ballot as the "first technology" of Voting Rights Act claims).2 This consciousness in enforcement flowed, no doubt, from the emphasis on access to the ballot obvious in the crucial provision of the Act, § 4, which used a mathematical method based totally on voter registration and

    introduced below the Equal Protection Clause. See, e. g., White v. Regester, 412 U. S. 755 (1973); Whitcomb v. Chavis, 403 U. S. 124 (1971); Burns v. Richardson, 384 U. S. seventy three (1966). The early improvement of our vote casting rights jurisprudence in those cases supplied the idea for our analysis of vote dilution below the amended §2 in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30 (1986).

    2 Cf. L. Guinier, The Tyranny of the Majority forty nine, n. 58 (1994) (hereinafter Guinier) ("The first technology of balloting litigation, and the 1965 statute which represented the congressional response, were worried with the entire and general exclusion of blacks from the electoral technique").


    895

    turnout in 1964 to outline certain "protected" jurisdictions wherein using literacy assessments turned into right now suspended. Pub. L. 89-one hundred ten, §four, seventy nine Stat. 438. Section 6 of the Act reflected the identical concern for registration because it supplied that federal examiners might be dispatched to included jurisdictions whenever the Lawyer General deemed it essential to oversee the registration of black voters. 42 U. S. C. § 1973d. And to save you evasion of the necessities of § 4, § 5 required that blanketed jurisdictions attain "preclearance" from the Department of Justice earlier than changing any "voting qualification or prerequisite to balloting, or general, practice, or procedure with admire to balloting." § 1973c.

    The Act turned into immediately and appreciably successful in doing away with limitations to registration and making sure get right of entry to to the ballot . For example, in Mississippi, black registration stages skyrocketed from 6.7% to fifty nine.8% in an insignificant two years; in Alabama the growth changed into from 19.three% to 51.6% inside the identical term. See Thernstrom 18. By the cease of 1967, black voter registration had reached as a minimum 50% in each covered State. See B. Grofman, L. Handley, & R. Niemi, Minority Representation and the Quest for Voting Equality 22 (1992).

    The Court s selection in Allen v. State Bd. of Elections, 393 U. S. 544 (1969), but, marked a essential shift within the focal point of the Act. In an opinion handling four associate instances, the Allen Court decided that the Act have to receive "the broadest feasible scope." Id., at 567. Thus, in Fairley v. Patterson, the Court decided that a covered jurisdiction s transfer from a districting system to an at-massive machine for election of county supervisors was a "wellknown, exercise, or system with appreciate to balloting," subject to preclearance beneath § 5. Id., at 569. Stating that the Act "turned into aimed toward the diffused, in addition to the plain, kingdom rules which have the impact of denying residents their right to vote due to their race," identity., at 565, the Court reasoned that § five s preclearance provisions ought to practice, not handiest to adjustments in electoral laws that pertain to


    896

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    registration and get right of entry to to the ballot , but to provisions that could "dilute" the pressure of minority votes that had been duly cast and counted. See identification., at 569. The selection in Allen hence ensured that the terms "trendy, practice, or manner" might amplify to encompass a big selection of electoral practices or voting systems that is probably challenged for decreasing the capacity impact of minority votes.

    As a consequence, Allen additionally ensured that courts would be required to confront a number of complicated and essentially political questions in assessing claims of vote dilution beneath the Voting Rights Act. The valuable issue in any vote dilution case, of path, is figuring out a factor of evaluation towards which dilution may be measured. As Justice Frankfurter found several years earlier than Allen, "[t]alk of debasement or dilution is round speak. One can not talk of debasement or dilution of the price of a vote until there is first defined a general of reference as to what a vote should be well worth." Baker v. Carr, 369 U. S. 186, 300 (1962) (dissenting opinion). See additionally Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30, 88 (1986) (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) ("[I]n order to determine whether an electoral system has made it tougher for minority citizens to opt for the applicants they opt for, a court docket need to have an idea in thoughts of ways difficult it must be for minority voters to go with their preferred applicants beneath an acceptable device"). But in placing the benchmark of what "undiluted" or absolutely "powerful" voting strength should be, a courtroom should always make a few judgments based merely on an assessment of standards of political concept. As Justice Harlan talked about in his dissent in Allen, the Voting Rights Act components no rule for a court to depend on in identifying, as an instance, whether or not a multimember at-massive system of election is to be preferred to a unmarried-member district system; that is, whether one offers a extra "effective" vote than any other. "Under one gadget, Negroes have a few have an impact on in the election of all officers; under the opposite, minority corporations have extra influence within the selection of fewer officers." Allen,


    897

    supra, at 586 (opinion concurring in part and dissenting in element). The desire is inherently a political one, and depends upon the choice of a principle for defining the fully "effective" vote-at backside, a theory for defining powerful participation in consultant authorities. In brief, what a court is truely asked to do in a vote dilution case is "to pick out among competing bases of illustration-ultimately, sincerely, amongst competing theories of political philosophy." Baker, supra, at three hundred (Frankfurter, J., dissenting).

    Perhaps the most outstanding feature of the philosophy that has emerged in vote dilution decisions when you consider that Allen has been the Court s desire for single-member districting schemes, each as a benchmark for measuring undiluted minority voting power and as a remedial mechanism for making certain minorities undiluted balloting electricity. See, e. g., Growe v. Emison, 507 U. S. 25, 40 (1993); Gingles, supra, at 50, n. 17 (asserting that the "unmarried-member district is typically the right preferred in opposition to which to degree minority group potential to go with"); Mobile v. Bolden, 446 U. S. 55, 66, n. 12 (1980) (plurality opinion) (noting that singlemember districts must be favored in courtroom-ordered remedial schemes); Connor v. Finch, 431 U. S. 407, 415 (1977) (equal). Indeed, commentators surveying the history of vote casting rights litigation have concluded that it has been the objective of vote casting rights plaintiffs to apply the Act to attack multimember districting schemes and to replace them with single-member districting systems drawn with majorityminority districts to make certain minority control of seats. See Guinier, 14 Cardozo L. Rev., at 1151; Guinier forty nine-54; Thernstrom 193.

    It have to be apparent, however, that there is no principle inherent in our constitutional machine, or even in the records of the Nation s electoral practices, that makes single-member districts the "right" mechanism for electing representatives to governmental our bodies or for giving "undiluted" effect to the votes of a numerical minority. On the opposite, from


    898

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    the earliest days of the Republic, multimember districts have been a not unusual feature of our political structures. The Framers left unanswered in the Constitution the query whether or not congressional delegations from the several States need to be elected on a wellknown price ticket from every State as a whole or beneath a districting scheme and left that remember to be resolved by using the States or via Congress. See U. S. Const., Art. I, § 4, cl. 1. It changed into now not till 1842 that Congress determined that Representatives need to be elected from single-member districts inside the States. See Act of June 25, 1842, ch. 47, 5 Stat. 491.3 Single-member districting changed into no greater the rule of thumb in the States themselves, for the Constitutions of maximum of the 13 original States supplied that representatives within the state legislatures were to be elected from multimember districts.four Today, although they have got come below growing assault under the Voting Rights Act, multimember district structures stay a feature on the American political landscape, specifically in municipal governments. See The Municipal Yearbook 14 (table) (1988) (over 60% of American towns use at-large election structures for their governing our bodies).

    The obvious advantage the Court has perceived in singlemember districts, of direction, is their tendency to beautify the ability of any numerical minority within the electorate to gain manipulate of seats in a representative frame. See Gingles, supra, at 50-fifty one. But in deciding on unmarried-member districting as a benchmark electoral plan on that basis the Court has made a political selection and, indeed, a decision that itself depends on a previous political desire made in solution to Justice Harlan s query in Allen. Justice Harlan asked whether a

    3 At that point, seven States elected their congressional delegations on a statewide price tag. See Wesberry v. Sanders, 376 U. S. 1, 8, n. eleven (1964).

    four See, e. g., Ga. Const., Art. IV (1777); Mass. Const., Part II, ch. I, § II, Arts. I, II (1780); N. H. Const., Part II (1784); N. J. Const., Art. III (1776); N. Y. Const., Art. IV (1777); S. C. Const., Art. XIII (1778). See additionally Klain, A New Look on the Constituencies: The Need for a Recount and a Reappraisal, forty nine Am. Pol. Sci. Rev. 1105, 1112-1113 (1955).


    899

    organization s votes should be taken into consideration to be greater "powerful" when they offer have an impact on over a more variety of seats, or control over a lesser range of seats. See 393 U. S., at 586. In answering that question, the Court has decided that the motive of the vote-or of the fully "effective" vote-is controlling seats. In other phrases, with the intention to develop requirements for assessing claims of dilution, the Court has adopted the view that contributors of any numerically good sized minority are denied a fully powerful use of the franchise unless they're capable of control seats in an elected frame.5 Under this idea, votes that do not manipulate a consultant are essentially wasted; folks who cast them move unrepresented and are just as certainly disenfranchised as if they had been barred from registering. Cf. identification., at 569 (equating denial of the capability to pick candidates with denial of the vote). Such conclusions, of direction, rely on a certain theory of the "powerful" vote, a theory that isn't always inherent in the idea of consultant democracy itself.6

    five See, e. g., Gingles, 478 U. S., at 88 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) (noting that the Court has decided that "minority voting strength is to be assessed completely in phrases of the minority group s capability to elect candidates it prefers") (emphasis deleted). See additionally Abrams, "Raising Politics Up": Minority Political Participation and Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act, sixty three N. Y. U. L. Rev. 449, 456, n. forty three, 468-471 (1988) (criticizing the Court s "electoral awareness" as a slim concept of "political opportunity"); Guinier forty nine (arguing that due to the fact Gingles, courts "have measured black political representation and participation completely by means of reference to the wide variety and consistent election of black applicants").

    6 Undoubtedly, one element that has brought on our cognizance on manage of seats has been a choice, whilst confronted with an summary query of political theory regarding the degree of powerful participation in government, to capture upon an objective general for figuring out cases, but a lot it can oversimplify the troubles earlier than us. If the usage of manipulate of seats as our preferred does not mirror a very nuanced idea of political participation, it at least has the superficial gain of attractive to the "most easily measured indicia of political power." Davis v. Bandemer, 478 U. S. 109, 157 (1986) (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment).


    900

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    In truth, it should be clear that the assumptions that have guided the Court mirror simplest one feasible knowledge of effective exercise of the franchise, an know-how based totally at the view that electorate are "represented" best once they pick out a delegate who will mirror their perspectives in the legislative halls. See normally H. Pitkin, The Concept of Representation 60-ninety one (1967).7 But it's miles certainly feasible to assemble a theory of effective political participation that could accord extra significance to voters capability to steer, in place of manage, elections. And mainly in a two-birthday celebration gadget which includes ours, the impact of a ability "swing" organization of voters composing 10% to 20% of the electorate in a given district can be tremendous.8 Even such a focus on sensible have an impact on, however, isn't always a necessary aspect of the definition of the "effective" vote. Some conceptions of consultant authorities may additionally basically emphasize the formal fee of the vote as a mechanism for participation in

    7 Indeed, the assumptions underpinning the Court s conclusions in large part parallel standards that John Stuart Mill advanced in providing a machine of proportional representation as an electoral reform in Great Britain. See J. S. Mill, Considerations on Representative Government (1861). In Mill s view, a simply device of consultant government required an electoral system that ensured "a minority of the electors might continually have a minority of the representatives." Id., at 133. To Mill, a gadget that allowed a portion of the populace that constituted a majority in each district to govern the election of all representatives and to defeat the minority s choice of candidates was unjust as it operated to provide a "entire disfranchisement of minorities." Id., at 132.

    eight We ourselves have tacitly mentioned that our modern-day view of what constitutes an effective vote may be concern to reevaluation, or as a minimum that it can no longer offer an distinctive definition of effective balloting power, as we again and again have reserved the question whether a vote dilution declare can be brought for failure to create minority "influence" districts. See, e. g., Voinovich v. Quilter, 507 U. S. 146, 154 (1993) (citing instances). Cf. Bandemer, supra, at 132 (noting that "the power to persuade the political manner is not limited to prevailing elections"); Gingles, supra, at ninety nine (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) (suggesting that the Court should no longer attention totally on a minority organization s potential to elect representatives in assessing the effectiveness of the institution s votes).


    901

    the electoral manner, whether it outcomes on top of things of a seat or no longer. Cf. identity., at 14-fifty nine.9 Under this sort of theory, minorities not able to govern elected posts could no longer be taken into consideration basically without a vote; as an alternative, a vote duly forged and counted might be deemed just as "effective" as another. If a minority institution is not able to control seats, that result might also plausibly be attributed to the inescapable fact that, in a majoritarian system, numerical minorities lose elections.10

    In brief, there are surely an endless variety of theories of effective suffrage, illustration, and the proper apportionment of political electricity in a consultant democracy that might be drawn upon to answer the questions posed in Allen. See generally Pitkin, supra. I do no longer pretend to have furnished the maximum state-of-the-art account of the numerous possibilities; but such subjects of political idea are beyond the normal sphere of federal judges. And that is precisely the factor. The matters the Court has got down to clear up in vote dilution cases are questions of political philosophy, now not questions of regulation.ll As such, they are now not with ease subjected

    nine Cf. also Levinson, Gerrymandering and the Brooding Omnipresence of Proportional Representation, 33 UCLA L. Rev. 257, 260-261 (1985).

    10 There are traces of this view in our instances as well. See Whitcomb, 403 U. S., at 153, 155; identification., at 160 ("The brief of it's miles that we're unprepared to preserve that district-based elections determined by plurality vote are unconstitutional in either unmarried- or multi-member districts actually because the supporters of dropping candidates don't have any legislative seats assigned to them"). See additionally League of United Latin American Citizens v. Midland Independent School Dist., 812 F.2d 1494, 1507 (CA5) (Higginbotham, J., dissenting) ("I had meant that the essence of our republican arrangement is that voting minorities lose"), vacated on rehearing, 829 F.second 546 (1987) (en bane) (in step with curiam).

    eleven The point is possibly so widely universal at this date that it needs little further demonstration. See, e. g., L. Tribe, American Constitutional Law § 13-7, p. 1076, n. 7 (2nd ed. 1988) (pointing out that "no approach [in vote dilution cases] can avoid the need for at least a few tough noticeable selections of political idea via the federal judiciary"); Howard & Howard, The Dilemma of the Voting Rights Act-Recognizing the Emerging Political Equality Norm, eighty three Colum. L. Rev. 1615, 1633, 1635 (1983) (hereinafter


    902

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    to any judicially manageable requirements which can manual courts in trying to pick among competing theories.

    But the political choices the Court has had to make do now not stop with the dedication that the primary motive of the "effective" vote is controlling seats or with the selection of single-member districting as the mechanism for supplying that manipulate. In one feel, those have been now not even the maximum important decisions to be made in devising requirements for assessing claims of dilution, for, in itself, the selection of singlemember districting as a benchmark election plan will inform a decide little approximately the quantity of minority districts to create. Single-member districting tells a courtroom "how" contributors of a minority are to manipulate seats, however now not "how many" seats they have to be allowed to govern.

    But "what number of" is the essential trouble. Once one accepts the proposition that the effectiveness of votes is measured in phrases of the manage of seats, the middle of any vote dilution declare is an assertion that the organization in question is not able to manipulate the "right" wide variety of seats-that is, the number of seats that the minority s percent of the populace could permit it to manipulate inside the benchmark "truthful" system. The declare is inherently based totally on ratios between the numbers of the minority in the populace and the numbers of seats controlled. As JUSTICE O CONNOR has cited, "any concept of vote dilution ought to necessarily rely to a point on a degree of minority balloting power that makes some reference to the proportion between the minority group and the voters at large." Gingles, 478 U. S., at eighty four (opinion concurring in judgment). As a result, handiest a mathematical calculation can answer the fundamental question posed by a claim of vote dilution. And once more, in selecting the proportion so one can be used to define the undiluted power of a minor-

    Howard & Howard) (arguing that the Court has evolved a "considerable concept of representative authorities" and a theory of "allocating political energy" in vote dilution cases).


    903

    ity-the ratio with a view to offer the principle for decision in a vote dilution case-a court docket must make a political choice.

    The ratio for which this Court has opted, and as a result the mathematical precept driving the outcomes in our cases, is undoubtedly direct proportionality. Indeed, four has memberships of the Court candidly identified in Gingles that the Court had adopted a rule of roughly proportional illustration, as a minimum to the extent proportionality turned into possible given the geographic dispersion of minority populations. See identification., at 85, ninety one, ninety eight-ninety nine (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment). While in itself that preference may additionally strike us intuitively because the fairest or most simply rule to use, opting for proportionality remains a political desire, no longer a result required by any principle of law.

    B

    The dabbling in political concept that dilution instances have caused, but, is rarely the worst element of our vote dilution jurisprudence. Far extra pernicious has been the Court s willingness to accept the only underlying premise that ought to tell each minority vote dilution claim: the assumption that the institution declaring dilution isn't always simply a racial or ethnic organization, but a collection having awesome political hobbies as well. Of necessity, in resolving vote dilution movements we've given credence to the view that race defines political interest. We have acted at the implicit assumption that participants of racial and ethnic businesses need to all assume alike on critical subjects of public coverage and must have their very own "minority favored" representatives holding seats in elected our bodies if they're to be taken into consideration represented in any respect.

    It is real that during Gingles we stated that whether a racial institution is "politically cohesive" may not be assumed, however as an alternative ought to be proved in every case. See 478 U. S., at fifty one, fifty six. See also Growe, 507 U. S., at 40-41. But the requirements we've got hired for determining political concord have proved so insubstantial that this "precondition" does no longer gift a great deal of a barrier to the statement of vote dilution


    904

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    claims on behalf of any racial groUp.12 Moreover, it offers no take a look at-indeed, it isn't always designed to offer a check-of whether or not race itself determines a special political network of interest. According to the rule followed in Gingles, plaintiffs have to show in reality that contributors of a racial institution generally tend to decide upon the identical applicants. See 478 U. S., at 61-67 (opinion of Brennan, J.). There is no set fashionable defining how sturdy the correlation need to be, and an inquiry into the purpose for the correlation (to determine, as an example, whether it might be the product of comparable socioeconomic pursuits in place of some other element associated with race) is not sensible. Ibid. See also id., at 100 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment).thirteen Thus, on every occasion similarities in political possibilities along racial lines exist, we proclaim that the motive of the correlation is inappropriate, however we correctly depend upon the reality of the correlation to expect that racial companies have precise political interests.

    12 Cf. Citizens for a Better Gretna v. Gretna, 834 F.second 496, 501-502 (CA5 1987) (emphasizing that political brotherly love beneath Gingles may be proven wherein a "full-size range" of minority citizens choose the same candidate, and suggesting that information showing that anywhere from forty nine% to sixty seven% of the participants of a minority institution favored the equal candidate set up brotherly love), cert. denied, 492 U. S. 905 (1989).

    13JUSTICE O CONNOR agreed with Justice Brennan in Gingles that, insofar as figuring out political brotherly love changed into involved, the motive for a correlation among race and candidate choice turned into inappropriate. She maintained, however, that proof of the reason of the correlation would nonetheless be applicable to the general vote dilution inquiry and specifically to the question whether a white majority will normally vote to defeat the minority s desired candidate. See 478 U. S., at a hundred (opinion concurring in judgment). The splintering of evaluations in Gingles on this point has produced, at quality, "uncertainty," Overton v. Austin, 871 F.2nd 529, 538 (CA5 1989), and has allowed bivariate regression evaluation-that is, an evaluation that measures merely the correlation between race and candidate choice and that does not immediately control for different factors-to come to be the norm for determining concord in vote dilution cases. See identification., at 539. But cf. League of United Latin American Citizens v. Clements, 999 F.2d 831, 850-851 (CA5 1993), cert. denied, 510 U. S. 1071 (1994).


    905

    As a end result, Gingles requirement of evidence of political cohesiveness, as practically applied, has proved little distinct from a operating assumption that racial agencies may be conceived of largely as political hobby organizations. And running underneath that assumption, we have assigned federal courts the undertaking of making sure that minorities are confident their "simply" proportion of seats in elected bodies throughout the Nation.

    To gain that result through the currently fashionable mechanism of drawing majority-minority single-member districts, we've got embarked upon what has been aptly characterised as a procedure of "developing racially safe boroughs. " United States v. Dallas County Comm n, 850 F.2nd 1433, 1444 (CAll 1988) (Hill, J., concurring mainly), cert. denied, 490 U. S. 1030 (1989). We have worried the federal courts, and certainly the Nation, in the employer of systematically dividing the country into electoral districts along racial strains-an organization of segregating the races into political homelands that amounts, in fact, to nothing quick of a machine of "political apartheid." Shaw, 509 U. S., at 647. See also identity., at 657 (noting that racial gerrymandering "may additionally balkanize us into competing racial factions"). Blacks are drawn into "black districts" and given "black representatives"; Hispanics are drawn into Hispanic districts and given "Hispanic representatives"; and so forth. Worse nevertheless, it isn't best the courts that have taken up this assignment. In response to judicial decisions and the promptings of the Justice Department, the States themselves, in an attempt to keep away from highly-priced and disruptive Voting Rights Act litigation, have began to gerrymander electoral districts in step with race. That practice now guarantees to embroil the courts in a lengthy procedure of trying to undo, or at least to minimize, the harm wrought through the system we created. See, e. g., Shaw, supra; Hays v. Louisiana, 839 F. Supp. 1188 (WD La. 1993), appeal pending, No. 93-1539.

    The assumptions upon which our vote dilution selections have been primarily based need to be repugnant to any kingdom that


    906

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    strives for the perfect of a shade-blind Constitution. "The precept of equality is at war with the belief that District A must be represented by means of a Negro, as it's far with the belief that District B need to be represented via a Caucasian, District C with the aid of a Jew, District D via a Catholic, and so forth." Wright v. Rockefeller, 376 U. S. fifty two, sixty six (1964) (Douglas, J., dissenting). Despite Justice Douglas caution sounded 30 years ago, our vote casting rights selections are rapidly progressing in the direction of a device that is indistinguishable in principle from a scheme underneath which contributors of different racial agencies are divided into separate electoral registers and allocated a proportion of political energy on the idea of race. Cf. identity., at 63-sixty six. Under our jurisprudence, as opposed to requiring registration on racial rolls and dividing strength basically on a populace foundation, we have surely resorted to the fairly less particular expedient of drawing geographic district strains to capture minority populations and to make sure the existence of the "suitable" range of "safe minority seats."

    That difference in the practical implementation of the idea, of direction, is immaterial.14 The fundamental premises underlying our device of safe minority districts and people at the back of the racial check in are the identical: that participants of the racial group ought to suppose alike and that their pursuits are so awesome that the group should be provided a separate frame of representatives within the legislature to voice its precise point of view. Such a "system, through something name it's miles referred to as, is a divisive pressure in a network, emphasizing differences among candidates and electorate which might be irrelevant." Id., at 66. Justice Douglas efficaciously expected the outcomes of state sponsorship of such a principle of representation: "When racial or religious

    14 Cf. Lijphart, Proportionality by Non-PR Methods: Ethnic Representation in Belgium, Cyprus, Lebanon, New Zealand, West Germany, and Zimbabwe, in Electoral Laws and Their Political Consequences 113, 116 (B. Grofman & A. Lijphart eds. 1986) (describing methods apart from separate electoral registers to allocate political electricity on the premise of ethnicity or race).


    907

    lines are drawn by using the State, ... antagonisms that relate to race or to faith rather than to political problems are generated; communities are looking for no longer the high-quality consultant however the first-rate racial or spiritual partisan." Id., at sixty seven. In brief, few devices might be better designed to exacerbate racial tensions than the consciously segregated districting gadget presently being built in the name of the Voting Rights Act.

    As a practical political be counted, our pressure to segregate political districts by means of race can simplest serve to deepen racial divisions by way of destroying any want for voters or candidates to construct bridges among racial agencies or to shape balloting coalitions. "Black-desired" candidates are assured election in "safe black districts"; white-preferred applicants are assured election in "safe white districts." Neither group wishes to draw on help from the alternative s constituency to win on election day. As one judge defined the cutting-edge fashion of voting rights cases: "We are bent upon polarizing political subdivisions by race. The association we assemble makes it needless, and likely unwise, for an elected reliable from a white majority district to be responsive in any respect to the needs of black residents; further, it's far politically unwise for a black legitimate from a black majority district to be responsive in any respect to white citizens." Dallas County Comm n, 850 F. 2nd, at 1444 (Hill, J., concurring specially).

    As this description suggests, the device we've got instituted affirmatively encourages a racially primarily based expertise of the representative function. The clear premise of the system is that geographic districts are merely a device to be manipulated to set up "black representatives" whose actual constituencies are defined, no longer in terms of the electorate who populate their districts, however in phrases of race. The "black consultant s" function, in other words, is to symbolize the "black hobby." Cf. Shaw, 509 U. S., at 650 (spotting that structures that "classify and separate voters via race" threaten "to undermine our device of representative democ-


    908

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    racy by signaling to elected officers that they constitute a particular racial group instead of their constituency as an entire").

    Perhaps not distinctly, america has now adopted precisely this idea of racial organization representation, because the arguments superior in every other case determined nowadays, Johnson v. De Grandy, submit, p. 997, should display. The case worried a declare that an apportionment plan for the Florida Legislature need to have supplied some other Hispanic district in Dade County. Florida spoke back to the claim of vote dilution through arguing that the plan already provided Dade County Hispanics with seats in share to their numbers. According to the Solicitor General, this declare of proportionality ought to had been evaluated, now not simply on the idea of the populace inside the Dade County place in which the racial gerrymandering became supposed to have passed off, however on a statewide basis. It did now not rely, inside the Solicitor General s view, that Hispanic populations some place else within the State couldn't meet the Gingles geographic compactness test, see 478 U. S., at 50, and for that reason could not possibly have managed districts in their own. After all, the Solicitor General reasoned, the Hispanic legislators elected from Hispanic districts in Dade County would constitute, now not simply the pursuits of the Dade County Hispanics, but the pursuits of all of the Hispanics in the State. Brief for United States in Johnson v. De Grandy, O. T. 1993, No. ninety two-519, p. 20. As the argument shows, at the least a few cautious observers have identified the racial gerrymandering in our vote dilution cases for what it's miles: a slightly less unique mechanism than the racial register for allocating illustration on the idea of race.

    C

    While the effects we have already achieved underneath the Voting Rights Act might appear bad sufficient, we have to understand that our approach to splintering the voters into racially certain unmarried-member districts does not via any manner


    909

    mark a limit on the authority federal judges may additionally wield to transform electoral systems underneath our Voting Rights Act jurisprudence. On the opposite, in relying on unmarried-member districting schemes as a touchstone, our cases so far have been somewhat arbitrarily limited to addressing the hobbies of minority electorate who are sufficiently geographically compact to shape a majority in a single-member district. See Gingles, supra, at forty nine-50. There is no cause a priori, but, that our awareness should be so restricted. The choice to depend on unmarried-member geographic districts as a mechanism for conducting elections is merely a political desire-and one that we would reconsider within the destiny. Indeed, it's miles a choice that has certainly been encouraged with the aid of the adversary procedure:

    In the cases that have come before us, plaintiffs have centered largely upon attacking multimember districts and have supplied single-member schemes because the benchmark of an "undiluted" opportunity.

    But as the unfavorable outcomes of our cutting-edge penchant for majority-minority districts emerge as greater apparent, cf. Shaw, supra, courts will absolutely be called upon to reconsider adherence to geographic districting as a method for making sure minority balloting energy. Already, a few advocates have criticized the current strategy of making majority-minority districts and feature advised the adoption of different voting mechanisms-for example, cumulative voting 15 or a machine the usage of

    15 Under a cumulative vote casting scheme, a machine typically utilized in corporations to guard the hobbies of minority shareholders, see R. Clark, Corporate Law § 9.1.three, pp. 361-366 (1986), every voter has as many votes as there are posts to be filled, and the voter might also forged as many of his votes as he wishes for a single candidate. The machine accordingly allows a numerical minority to pay attention its voting power behind a given candidate with out requiring that the minority voters themselves be concentrated right into a single district. For a whole description of the mechanics of cumulative vote casting, see Zimmerman, The Federal Voting Rights Act and Alternative Election Systems, 19 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 621, 654-657 (1978).


    910

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    transferable votes 16-that can produce proportional effects with out requiring division of the voters into racially segregated districts. Cf., e. g., Guinier 14-15, 94-a hundred and one; Howard & Howard 1660; Karlan, Maps and Misreadings: The Role of Geographic Compactness in Racial Vote Dilution Litigation, 24 Harv. Civ. Rights-Civ. Lib. L. Rev. 173, 174-175,231236 (1989) (hereinafter Karlan); Taebel, Engstrom, & Cole, Alternative Electoral Systems As Remedies for Minority Vote Dilution, 11 Hamline J. of Public Law & Policy 19 (1990); Note, Reconciling the Right to Vote with the Voting Rights Act, ninety two Colum. L. Rev. 1810, 1857-1865 (1992).

    Such adjustments may additionally seem radical departures from the electoral systems with which we're maximum acquainted. Indeed, they'll be undesirable through the human beings within the several States who purposely have followed districting systems of their electoral laws. But nothing in our gift know-how of the Voting Rights Act locations a principled restrict at the authority of federal courts that could prevent them from instituting a machine of cumulative balloting as a treatment beneath § 2, or even from setting up a more complex mechanism for securing proportional representation based totally on transferable votes.17 As some has memberships of the Court have already recog-

    16 A device using transferable votes is designed to make sure proportional representation with "mathematical exactness." Id., at 640. Under one of these system, every voter rank orders his picks of candidates. To win, a candidate have to get hold of a fixed quota of votes, which may be set via any of numerous techniques. Ballots listing a given candidate as the voter s first choice are counted for that candidate till the candidate has secured the quota of votes vital for election. Remaining first-desire ballots for that candidate are then transferred to some other candidate, usually the one listed as the second preference on the poll. See identification., at 640-642. Like cumulative vote casting, the device allows a minority group to pay attention its voting power with out requiring districting, and it has the additional gain of ensuring that "surplus" votes are transferred to aid the election of the minority voters subsequent choice.

    17 Such methods of voting can not be rejected out-of-hand as bizarre concoctions of Voting Rights Act plaintiffs. The machine of transferable votes turned into a extensively celebrated, even though unsuccessful, idea for English par-


    911

    nized, geographic districting isn't always a demand inherent in our political gadget. See, e. g., Davis v. Bandemer, 478 U. S. 109, 159 (1986) (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) ("Districting itself represents a center floor between winner-take-all statewide elections and proportional representation for political parties"); id., at 160 (noting that our cutting-edge practice of accepting district-primarily based elections as a given is truely a "political judgment"). Rather, districting is simply some other political preference made by using the citizenry inside the drafting of their nation constitutions. Like other political choices concerning electoral structures and fashions of representation, it too is possibly subject to a judicial override if it comes into conflict with the theories of representation and effective balloting that we may additionally expand beneath the Voting Rights Act.

    Indeed, the unvarnished truth is that every one that is required for districting to fall out of fashion is for has memberships of this Court to further broaden their political thinking. We need to now not be amazed if vote casting rights advocates inspire us to "revive our political imagination," Guinier, 14 Cardozo L. Rev., at 1137, and to remember "progressive and nontraditional remedies" for vote dilution, Karlan 221, for below our Voting Rights Act jurisprudence, it is only the bounds on our "political creativeness" that place restraints on the requirements we may pick out for outlining undiluted vote casting systems. Once we candidly understand that geographic districting and other aspects of electoral structures that we've got up to now located beyond question are merely political picks, those practices, too,

    liamentary reform inside the closing century. See commonly T. Hare, Election of Representatives (4th ed. 1873); J. S. Mill, Considerations on Representative Government (1861). And even as it is an oddity in American political history, cumulative balloting in an at-large machine has been employed in some American jurisdictions. See Weaver, Semi-Proportional and Proportional Representation Systems in the United States, in Choosing an Electoral System 191, 198 (A. Lijphart & B. Grofman eds. 1984); Hyneman & Morgan, Cumulative Voting in Illinois, 32 Ill. L. Rev. 12 (1937). See additionally Ill. Const., Art. IV, §§ 7, 8 (1870).


    912

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    may additionally fall beneath suspicion of getting a dilutive impact on minority voting energy. And while the time comes to put the question to the test, it may be tough certainly for a Court that, below Gingles, has been bent on creating more or less proportional illustration for geographically compact minorities to find a principled cause for containing that a geographically dispersed minority can't undertaking districting itself as a dilutive electoral practice. In precept, cumulative vote casting and other non-district-primarily based techniques of effecting proportional representation are genuinely greater green and simple mechanisms for attaining what has already grow to be our tacit objective: roughly proportional allocation of political energy according to race.

    At least one court, in truth, has already deserted districting and has opted alternatively for cumulative voting on a countywide foundation as a remedy for a Voting Rights Act violation. The District Court for the District of Maryland these days reasoned that, compared to a gadget that divides electorate into districts in step with race, "[c]umulative voting is much less probably to growth polarization between exclusive pursuits," and that it "will allow the electorate, via the way they exercising their votes, to district themselves," thereby warding off government involvement in a manner of segregating the voters. Cane v. Worcester County, 847 F. Supp. 369, 373 (1994). Cf. Guinier, 14 Cardozo L. Rev., at 1135-1136 (featuring a similar evaluation of the benefits of cumulative vote casting); Karlan 236 (equal). If such a gadget may be ordered on a countywide foundation, we must recognize that there may be no limiting precept underneath the Act that might prevent federal courts from requiring it for elections to nation legislatures as nicely.

    D

    Such is the contemporary kingdom of our information of the Voting Rights Act. That our reading of the Act has assigned the federal judiciary the assignment of making the selections I even have described above must endorse to the has memberships of this Court


    913

    that something in our jurisprudence has long past awry.18 We could be mighty Platonic guardians indeed if Congress had granted us the authority to determine the first-class form of local government for each county, metropolis, village, and city in America. But below our constitutional machine, this Court is not a centralized politburo appointed for life to dictate to the provinces the "accurate" theories of democratic representation, the "best" electoral systems for securing truely "representative" government, the "fairest" proportions of minority political have an impact on, or, as respondents would have us maintain nowadays, the "proper" sizes for neighborhood governing bodies. We should be careful in deciphering any Act of Congress to furnish us energy to make such determinations.

    JUSTICE BLACKMUN shows that, if we were to interpret the Act to allow challenges to the scale of governmental bodies beneath § 2, the Court s energy to determine the shape that nearby governing bodies ought to take would be bounded by using the constraints that local customs offer within the shape of benchmarks. Post, at 952-953. But as JUSTICE O CONNOR rightly factors out, such benchmarks are themselves arbitrarily decided on and could provide no confident limits on judicial electricity. Ante, at 888-891. In my view, the neighborhood requirements to which JUSTICE BLACKMUN points nowadays are little distinctive from the numerous requirements to which the Court has resorted inside the past as touchstones of undiluted balloting systems. The appeal to such standards, which can be always arbitrarily selected, need to no longer serve to obscure the belief in the Court s vote dilution jurisprudence of a sweeping

    18JUSTICE STEVENS shows that the dialogue above outlines coverage arguments first-class addressed to Congress. See submit, at 957. In one feel, this is exactly my factor. The issues I even have discussed above involve policy choices which can be matters pleasant left to Congress. Our interpretation of the Voting Rights Act, however, has required federal courts to take over the policymaking role within the place of balloting rights and has pressured judges to make choices on subjects past the everyday sphere of judicial competence.


    914

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    authority to pick the electoral structures to be used by each governing frame in each of the 50 States, and to do so based upon little extra than the passing choice of five has memberships of this Court for one political principle over every other.

    A full knowledge of the authority that our modern-day interpretation of the Voting Rights Act assigns to the federal courts, and of the negative outcomes that our exercise of that authority is currently having upon our body politic, compels a single end: A systematic reexamination of our interpretation of the Act is required.

    II

    Section 2(a) of the Voting Rights Act provides that "[n]o vote casting qualification or prerequisite to voting or wellknown, practice, or technique shall be imposed or carried out via any State or political subdivision in a manner which results in a denial or abridgement of the proper of any citizen of america to vote" resulting from race, coloration, or club in one of the language minority businesses described in the Act. forty two U. S. C. § 1973(a). Respondents contend that the phrases "general, exercise, or method" must increase to cover the size of a governmental frame. An examination of the textual content of § 2 makes it clean, however, that the terms of the Act do not attain that some distance; certainly, the phrases of the Act do now not allow a number of the demanding situations to electoral mechanisms that we've got permitted within the past. Properly understood, the terms "standard, practice, or technique" in § 2(a) refer simplest to practices that affect minority residents get right of entry to to the poll. Districting structures and electoral mechanisms that could affect the "weight" given to a ballot duly forged and counted are certainly past the purview of the Act.

    A

    In determining the scope of § 2(a), as whilst interpreting any statute, we ought to start with the statutory language. See Connecticut Nat. Bank v. Germain, 503 U. S. 249, 253-


    915

    254 (1992). Under the obvious terms of the Act, § 2(a) covers handiest a defined class of nation moves. Only "vote casting qualification[s]," "prerequisite[s] to balloting," or "preferred[s], practice[s], or process[s]" are difficulty to undertaking below the Act. The first two objects in this listing without a doubt talk over with conditions or tests implemented to alter residents access to the poll. They might cover, for example, any shape of take a look at or requirement imposed as a condition on registration or on the system of vote casting on election day.

    Taken in isolation, the last grouping of phrases-"standard, practice, or system"-can also appear quite less specific. If we supply the words their normal meanings, however-for they haven't any technical importance and are not described inside the Act-they would no longer commonly be understood to include the size of a local governing body. Common feel shows that the size of a governing body and other components of presidency structure do now not effortlessly fit inside the terms "widespread, practice, or technique." Moreover, we want now not actually deal with the phrases in isolation; certainly, it'd be a mistake to do so. Cf. United Sav. Assn. of Tex. v. Timbers of Inwood Forest Associates, Ltd., 484 U. S. 365, 371 (1988). Reading the phrases in context strongly suggests that § 2(a) have to be understood as regarding any wellknown, practice, or technique with respect to vote casting. And as a consequence understood, the terms of the phase would not expand to the scale of a governmental body; we might now not commonly describe the scale or shape of a governing authority as a "exercise" or "procedure" concerning balloting.

    But beneath our precedents, we have already stretched the phrases "fashionable, exercise, or process" past the boundaries of everyday which means. We have concluded, for instance, that the choice of a sure set of district lines is a "technique," or possibly a "practice," concerning vote casting challenge to mission under the Act, see Growe, 507 U. S., at 40-forty one, despite the fact that the drawing of a given set of district lines has not anything to do with the fundamental process of permitting a citizen to vote-that is,


    916

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    the method of registering, casting a poll, and having it counted. Similarly, we've got decided that the use of multimember districts, rather than single-member districts, can be challenged below the Act. See Gingles, 478 U. S., at forty six-fifty one. Undoubtedly, one of the important reasons we have read § 2 to reach such districting selections is that the selection of 1 districting device over some other can affect a minority group s electricity to control seats in the elected frame. See ibid. In that respect, however, the districting practices we've handled as concern to undertaking below the Act are basically much like selections regarding the dimensions of a governing authority. Just as drawing district strains one manner rather than every other, or the usage of one form of districting system instead of another, can affect the capability of a minority institution to manipulate seats, so can limiting the variety of seats that are available. And if how districts are drawn is a "practice" regarding balloting, why now not conclude that what number of districts are drawn is a "exercise" as well?

    To be sure, a distinction can be made between the size of a local governing frame and a districting mechanism. After all, we'd often suppose that the size of a government has extra independent significance for the functioning of the governmental body than the selection of districting structures apportioning representation. Interfering with the shape of presidency, consequently, would possibly appear to contain a more intrusion on state sovereignty. But such differences between the dimensions of a governing body and other ability "vote casting practices" do not, at backside, rely on how closely every is associated with "vote casting," and for that reason they're not rooted in any manner within the textual content of § 2(a). On the contrary, at the same time as it can appear apparent that the dimensions of a government is not within the attain of the Act, if we look to the textual content of the statute for the proscribing precept that confines the terms "wellknown, practice, or procedure" and excludes authorities size from their reach, we need to conclude that the handiest line drawn in § 2 excludes many


    917

    "practices" that we've already determined are challenge to mission below the Act.

    If we return to the Act to reexamine the terms setting out the movements regulated by using § 2, a cautious reading of the statutory textual content will screen a good buy more about the constraints on the scope of the section than counseled above. The phrases "standard, practice, or process" appear to have been covered in § 2 as a sort of catchall provision. They seem phrased with a watch to removing the opportunity of evasion.19 Nevertheless, they're catchall terms that round out a list, and a sensible and lengthy-hooked up maxim of creation limits the way we have to apprehend such general phrases appended to an enumeration of extra unique items. The precept of ejusdem generis indicates that such general phrases need to be understood to refer to gadgets belonging to the same magnificence this is defined by means of the greater specific terms within the list. See, e. g., Cleveland v. United States, 329 U. S. 14, 18 (1946).

    Here, the particular items defined in § 2(a) ("voting qualification[sJ" and "prerequisite[sJ to vote casting") indicate that Congress became worried in this segment with any method, but it is probably denominated, that regulates citizens get entry to to the ballot -that is, any manner that would erect a barrier to prevent the capability voter from casting his vote. In describing the laws that could be subject to § 2, Congress focused interest upon provisions regulating the interplay among the character voter and the voting method-on hurdles the citizen would possibly need to move within the form of "stipulations" or "qualifications." The popular phrases inside the section are maximum naturally understood, therefore, to consult

    19 Cf. South Carolina v. Katzenbach, 383 U. S. 301, 335 (1966) (noting that "Congress knew that a number of the States ... had resorted to the brilliant stratagem of contriving new rules of numerous sorts for the only cause of perpetuating vote casting discrimination inside the face of unfavourable federal court docket decrees" and that "Congress had reason to suppose that these States may strive similar maneuvers in the future").


    918

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    any methods for engaging in a part of the vote casting process that would in addition be used to intervene with a citizen s capacity to solid his vote, and they may be certainly intended to ensure that the entire vote casting manner-a method that starts with registration and consists of the casting of a poll and having the poll counted-is protected by means of the Act. Cf. infra, at 919920. Simply by means of including preferred terms in § 2(a) to ensure the efficacy of the limit imposed, Congress ought to now not be understood to have expanded the scope of the restriction past the logical limits implied inside the precise phrases of the statute. Cf. Cleveland, supra, at 18 ("Under the ejusdem generis rule of creation the general phrases are constrained to the magnificence and may not be used to enlarge it").

    Moreover, it isn't always only within the terms describing the practices regulated underneath the Act that § 2(a) makes a speciality of the character voter. The segment also speaks simplest inside the singular of the right of "any citizen" to vote. Giving the terms "general, exercise, or method" an expansive interpretation to attain potentially dilutive practices, however, would distort that focus on the individual, for a vote dilution declare always relies upon at the announcement of a set proper. Cf. Bandemer, 478 U. S., at a hundred and fifty-151 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment). At the heart of the declare is the contention that the contributors of a group together have been not able to exert the have an impact on that their numbers advise they may underneath an alternative device. Such a collection right, but, unearths no grounding inside the phrases of § 2(a).

    Of direction, the scope of the proper that is protected underneath the Act can offer similarly guidance concerning the which means of the terms "standard, practice, or process." Under the terms of the Act, simplest a "fashionable, practice, or system" that may result in the "denial or abridgement of the right ... to vote" is in the reach of § 2(a). But not anything inside the language utilized in § 2(a) to explain the safety provided with the aid of the Act indicates that in defensive the "right to vote," the section become intended to comprise a idea of vot-


    919

    ing that includes a situation for the "weight" or "influence" of votes. On the contrary, the definition of the terms "vote" and "voting" in § 14(c)(1) of the Act focuses exactly on get entry to to the ballot . Thus, § 14(c)(1) affords that the phrases "vote" and "voting" shall encompass any measures important to ensure "registration" and any "other movement required by using regulation prerequisite to balloting, casting a ballot , and having such ballot counted nicely and protected in the ideal totals of votes forged." forty two U. S. C. § 1973l(c)(1).

    It is real that § 14(c)(1) additionally states that the term "vote casting" "encompass[s] all action important to make a vote effective," ibid. (emphasis delivered), and the Court has seized in this language as a demonstration that Congress supposed the Act to attain claims of vote dilution. See Allen, 393 U. S., at 566. But if the phrase "effective" isn't plucked out of context, the rest of § 14(c)(1) makes clean that the movements Congress deemed essential to make a vote "powerful" were exactly the actions indexed above: registering, pleasant other voting conditions, casting a ballot , and having it included inside the final tally of votes forged. These actions are defined inside the section simplest as examples of the stairs vital to make a vote powerful. See forty two U. S. C. § 1973l(c)(1). And while the listing of such actions isn't unique, the nature of all of the examples which can be furnished demonstrates that as a ways as the Act is involved, an "powerful" vote is simply one which has been solid and fairly counted. See 393 U. S., at 590, n. 7 (Harlan, J., concurring in part and dissenting in element).

    Reading the Act s prohibition of practices which could bring about a "denial or abridgement of the proper ... to vote" as protective simplest get entry to to the ballot additionally yields an interpretation this is steady with the Court s construction of in reality same language inside the Fifteenth Amendment. The use of language taken from the Amendment indicates that the segment became meant to shield a "proper to vote" with the equal scope as the right secured with the aid of the Amendment itself; truly, no motive appears from the textual content of the Act for giving


    920

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    the language a broader production within the statute than we've given it inside the Constitution. The Court has by no means decided, but, whether the Fifteenth Amendment ought to be understood to shield against vote "dilution." See Voinovich v. Quilter, 507 U. S. 146, 159 (1993). See additionally Beer v. United States, 425 U. S. 130, 142, n. 14 (1976) (noting that there's no decision of this Court maintaining a legislative apportionment plan violative of the Fifteenth Amendment).2o

    While the terms of § 2(a) as a consequence imply that the section focuses only on securing get entry to to the poll, it might be argued that reenactment of § 2 in 1982 should be understood as an endorsement of the interpretation contained in cases along with Allen that the terms "general, practice, or process" have been meant to attain probably dilutive practices. See Lorillard v. Pons, 434 U. S. 575, 580-581 (1978). It is genuine that we usually will assume that reenactment of specific statutory language is meant to include a "settled judicial interpretation" of that language. Pierce v. Underwood, 487 U. S. 552, 567 (1988). And at the same time as § 2 become amended in

    20 Indeed, in Mobile v. Bolden, 446 U. S. 55 (1980), a plurality of the Court concluded that the Fifteenth Amendment did now not cope with issues of dilution at all. See identity., at 65. Cf. identification., at eighty four, n. 3 (STEVENS, J., concurring in judgment) (noting that the plurality had concluded that the Fifteenth Amendment "applies most effective to practices that directly affect get right of entry to to the poll and hence is totally inapplicable to the case at bar").

    Contrary to JUSTICE STEVENS pointers, publish, at 958, 962, Gomillion v. Lightfoot, 364 U. S. 339 (1960), does no longer indicate that the Fifteenth Amendment, in protective the proper to vote, incorporates a difficulty for whatever past securing get entry to to the ballot . The Gomillion plaintiffs claims targeted precisely on access: Their criticism turned into now not that the burden in their votes had been faded in a few way, however that the boundaries of a city have been attracted to prevent blacks from voting in municipal elections altogether. Id., at 341. Gomillion accordingly "continues the difference between an attempt to exclude Negroes completely from the relevant constituency, and a statute that allows Negroes to vote but which uses the gerrymander to comprise the effect of Negro suffrage." Allen v. State Bd. of Elections, 393 U. S. 544, 589 (1969) (Harlan, J., concurring in component and dissenting in part).


    921

    1982, the amended section did preserve the identical language that had seemed inside the unique Act regulating "widespread[s], exercise [s], or system[s]." 21 But it changed into rarely well settled in 1982 that Allen s wide reading of the terms "fashionable, exercise, or manner" in § 5 could set the scope of § 2 as a provision achieving claims of vote dilution.

    On the contrary, in 1980 in Mobile v. Bolden, 446 U. S. fifty five, a plurality of the Court construed § 2 in a manner flatly inconsistent with the know-how that those terms have been meant to reach dilutive practices. Emphasizing that the phase tracked the language of the Fifteenth Amendment via prohibiting the use of practices that would "deny or abridge the right ... to vote," the Bolden plurality determined that § 2 became "intended to have an impact no exclusive from that of the Fifteenth Amendment itself." Id., at sixty one. In the plurality s view, but, the Fifteenth Amendment did not amplify to attain dilution claims; its protections had been happy so long as members of racial minorities ought to " sign in and vote without dilemma. " Id., at 65. Bolden remained the final word from this Court interpreting § 2 on the time the phase became amended in 1982. Cf. Rogers v. Lodge, 458 U. S. 613, 619, n. 6 (1982). Thus, the reenactment in the amended segment of the same language covering any "fashionable, practice, or technique" and the retention of genuinely same language defensive against the "denial or abridgement of the proper ... to vote" can rarely be understood as an endorsement of a huge studying of the segment as a provision reaching claims of vote dilution.22

    21 The original § 2 provided that no "standard, practice, or method" must be imposed or carried out "to deny or abridge the proper ... to vote." Pub. L. 89-110, §2, seventy nine Stat. 437.

    22 If anything, making use of the Lorillard v. Pons, 434 U. S. 575 (1978), principle of production would possibly suggest that, via reenacting without a doubt the equal language derived from the Fifteenth Amendment to define the primary interest protected through the Act, Congress supposed to maintain the quandary that the Bolden plurality discovered implicit in that language. It is obvious from the phrases of the amendments surpassed in 1982 that where Congress sought


    922

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    Finally, as our instances have proven, analyzing § 2(a) to attain past laws that regulate in a few way citizens access to the ballot turns the phase into a command for courts to evaluate summary ideas of political concept if you want to expand rules for finding out which votes are "diluted" and which aren't. See generally supra, at 894-903. Common feel might suggest that we should not lightly interpret the Act to require courts to address such matters to date outdoor the everyday bounds of judicial competence, and the mere use of three extra widespread phrases at the cease of the list of regulated practices in § 2(a) cannot well be understood to contain such an expansive command into the Act.

    Properly understood, therefore, § 2(a) is a provision designed to protect access to the ballot , and in regulating "wellknown[s], exercise [s], and system[s]," it reaches only "the ones state legal guidelines that [relate to] both voter qualifications or the way wherein elections are performed." Allen, 393 U. S., at 591 (Harlan, J., concurring in element and dissenting in part). The section hence covers all way of registration necessities, the practices surrounding registration (including the choice of instances and places in which registration takes region and the choice of registrars), the places of polling locations, the times polls are open, the usage of paper ballots as opposed to balloting machines, and other similar factors of the voting process that might be manipulated to disclaim any citizen the proper to solid a poll and feature it well counted. The

    to adjust the information of the Act introduced in Bolden, it did so explicitly in the textual content of the statute. As I provide an explanation for more fully, infra, at 923-925, the 1982 amendments modified § 2 to remove the requirement underneath Bolden that § 2 plaintiffs, like plaintiffs underneath the Fifteenth Amendment, display that a challenged practice become adopted with a discriminatory intent, see 446 U. S., at sixty two-sixty three, and replaced that test with unique language in § 2(b) setting a fashionable based simply on discriminatory effects. See Pub. L. ninety seven-205, § three, 96 Stat. 134. Had Congress intended to modify the knowledge that § 2 protects a concept of the "proper to vote" that doesn't extend to restrict vote dilution, it in all likelihood might have addressed that aspect of Bolden explicitly as properly.


    923

    segment does now not cowl, but, the selection of a multimember over a unmarried-member districting machine or the selection of 1 set of districting lines over another, or another such electoral mechanism or method of election that might lessen the weight or have an effect on a ballot can also have in controlling the final results of an election.

    Of course, this interpretation of the terms "general, exercise, or method" correctly method that § 2(a) does no longer provide for any claims of what we have known as vote "dilution." But that is precisely the result recommended via the text of the statute. Section 2(a) nowhere makes use of the term "vote dilution" or suggests that its goal is to make certain that votes are given their proper "weight." And an exam of § 2(b) does not advise any specific end result. It is true that during construing § 2 to attain vote dilution claims in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30 (1986), the Court relied largely on the gloss on § 2(b) provided within the legislative history of the 1982 amendments to the Act. See id., at 43-forty six. But the text of § 2(b) elements a susceptible basis certainly for studying the Act to reach such claims.

    As the Court concluded in Gingles, the 1982 amendments integrated into the Act, and particularly into § 2(b), a "results" check for measuring violations of § 2(a). That check became meant to replace, for § 2 functions, the "intent" check the Court had announced in Bolden for balloting rights claims underneath § 2 of the Voting Rights Act and under the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments. Section 2(a) as a result prohibits positive kingdom moves that could "resul[t] in a denial or abridgement" of the right to vote, and § 2(b) incorporates really the exact language of the "outcomes test" hired by means of the Court in White v. Regester, 412 U. S. 755 (1973), and implemented in constitutional vote casting rights cases earlier than our selection in Bolden. The section directs courts to recollect whether or not "based at the totality of situations," a state practice results in participants of a minority organization "hav[ing] less opportunity than other contributors of the citizens to take part in


    924

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    the political technique and to select representatives of their desire." 42 U. S. C. § 1973(b). Cf. White, supra, at 766; Whitcomb v. Chavis, 403 U. S. 124, 149 (1971).

    But the mere adoption of a "results" check, in place of an "motive" check, says nothing about the kind of state laws that may be challenged the usage of that take a look at. On the opposite, the type of kingdom regulation that may be challenged beneath § 2 is addressed explicitly in § 2(a). As we referred to in Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380 (1991), §§ 2(a) and (b) deal with awesome problems. While § 2(a) defines and explicitly limits the sort of voting practice that may be challenged beneath the Act, § 2(b) gives most effective "the check for determining the legality of this type of exercise." Id., at 391. Thus, as an preliminary matter, there may be no reason to assume that § 2(b) could serve to enlarge the scope of the prohibition in § 2(a), which, as I described above, does no longer enlarge by means of its phrases to electoral mechanisms that could have a dilutive effect on organization voting strength.

    Even putting that difficulty aside for the moment, it need to be apparent that the incorporation of a effects take a look at into the amended segment does now not necessarily advocate that Congress intended to allow claims of vote dilution beneath § 2. A consequences test is beneficial to plaintiffs whether or not they may be hard legal guidelines that restriction get admission to to the ballot or laws that accomplish a few diminution in the "right weight" of a group s vote. Nothing approximately the test itself indicates that it is inherently tied to vote dilution claims. A law, as an instance, proscribing the instances and locations at which registration can arise might be adopted with the purpose of restricting black voter registration, but it could be extremely tough to show the discriminatory motive in the back of this kind of facially neutral regulation. The outcomes test would allow plaintiffs to mount a a success project to the regulation under § 2 without such evidence.

    Moreover, nothing in the language § 2(b) makes use of to explain the outcomes test particularly indicates that the check become meant to be used under the Act for assessing claims of dilution. Section 2(b) directs courts to remember whether or not, beneath


    925

    the "totality of circumstances," individuals of a minority group "have less opportunity than other participants of the voters to participate in the political technique and to choose representatives of their choice." forty two U. S. C. § 1973(b). The most natural studying of that language might advise that residents have an equal "opportunity" to participate in the electoral method and an equal "opportunity" to pick representatives once they were given the same free and open get admission to to the poll as different citizens and their votes had been well counted. The segment speaks in phrases of an opportunity-a danger-to participate and to opt for, no longer an assured capability to gain any precise result. And because the ballot offers the formal mechanism for acquiring get admission to to the political manner and for electing representatives, it would appear that one who has had the equal threat as others to check in and to cast his poll has had an same possibility to take part and to choose, whether or not or now not any of the candidates he chooses is in the long run a hit.

    To be sure, the check in § 2(b) might be study to use to claims of vote dilution as properly. But to conclude, as an example, that a multimember districting machine had denied a set of voters an same opportunity to participate inside the political system and to elect representatives, a court could must embark on the prolonged undertaking in political principle that I defined above in Part I of this opinion. In different words, a courtroom might have to broaden a few theory of the benchmark undiluted balloting gadget that offers minorities with the "fairest" or most "equitable" percentage of political impact. Undoubtedly, a dizzying array of principles of political equality might be described to useful resource in that venture, and each might be used to attribute distinct values to one-of-a-kind systems of election. See, e. g., Still, Political Equality and Election Systems, 91 Ethics 375 (1981).23 But the statutory command to deter-

    23 See additionally Banzhaf, Multi-has club Electoral Districts-Do They Violate the "One Man, One Vote" Principle, seventy five Yale L. J. 1309 (1966) (suggesting that how close distinctive districting systems come to supplying men and women


    926

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    mine whether individuals of a minority have had an equal "opportunity ... to participate in the political manner and to select representatives" presents no steerage concerning which one of the feasible requirements placing undiluted balloting power must be chosen over the others. And it would be opposite to not unusual experience to study § 2(b) s reference to equal possibility as a charter for federal courts to embark on the bold assignment of developing a principle of political equality to be imposed on the Nation.24

    It is true that one factor courts might also bear in mind under the outcomes check may healthy greater with no trouble with an interpretation of the Act that reaches vote dilution claims. Section 2(b) presents that "one circumstance" that may be considered in assessing the effects check is the "extent to which contributors of a covered elegance were elected to workplace." forty two U. S. c. § 1973(b). Obviously, electoral consequences might be relevant to claims of vote dilution (assuming, of direction, that manipulate

    same political "electricity" can be measured through evaluating the statistical possibility underneath each device that someone s vote will determine the election end result). Cf. Whitcomb, 403 U. S., at one hundred forty five, n. 23.

    24 In addition, in a single respect there's a tremendous anxiety among the phrases of the consequences take a look at and an interpretation of the Act that reaches vote dilution claims. Section 2(b) provides that a violation can be established where it's miles proven that members of a minority have less possibility than different participants of the electorate "to participate within the political system and to decide on representatives of their desire." forty two U. S. C. § 1973(b) (emphasis brought). We have held that any challenged "popular, exercise, or system" ought to have both of those consequences to violate the take a look at mentioned in § 2(b). See Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380, 397 (1991). It isn't always clean, but, that a probably dilutive districting approach can satisfy both prongs of the test. The primary impact of the selection of 1 districting gadget over another will be the direct and mathematically quantifiable impact that the machine can have on a minority organization s capacity to govern a given variety of seats. But even though one assumes that a districting machine may additionally consequently be said to impair a group s "opportunity" to "opt for representatives of its preference," it's far tough to see how a districting gadget could be stated to impair a set s opportunity to "participate inside the political method," at least if participation is thought to have any that means distinct from controlling seats.


    927

    of seats has been selected because the measure of effective balloting). But in some occasions, outcomes in current elections can also be applicable for demonstrating that a specific exercise concerning registration or polling has served to suppress minority balloting. Better elements to don't forget might be figures for voter registration or turnout at the closing election, broken down in keeping with race. But wherein such information are not readily available, election results may also surely be "one circumstance" to recall in determining whether or not a challenged exercise has resulted in denying a minority organization get admission to to the political procedure. The Act merely directs courts no longer to ignore such evidence of electoral consequences altogether.

    Moreover, the language supplying that electoral effects may be considered as "one circumstance" in the outcomes check is explicitly qualified by means of the provision in § 2(b) that most at once speaks to the question whether § 2 turned into meant to reach claims of vote dilution-and which suggests that dilution claims are not covered with the aid of the section. The closing clause inside the subsection states in unmistakable terms that "nothing in this phase establishes a proper to have individuals of a covered magnificence elected in numbers identical to their percentage in the populace." forty two U. s. C. § 1973(b). As four has memberships of the Court discovered in Gingles, there's "an inherent anxiety" between this disclaimer of proportional illustration and an interpretation of § 2 that encompasses vote dilution claims. 478 U. S., at 84 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment). As I explained above, dilution claims, by means of their very nature, rely on a mathematical principle. The heart of the declare is an statement that the plaintiff group does no longer preserve the "proper" variety of seats. As a end result, the precept for finding out the case must be furnished via an arithmetic ratio. Either the group has attained the "proper" wide variety of seats underneath the modern election system, or it has not.

    By putting forward that the phase gives no right to proportional representation, § 2(b) always instructions that the life or absence of proportional electoral effects must


    928

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    no longer emerge as the finding out issue in assessing § 2 claims. But in doing so, § 2(b) eliminates from attention the maximum logical ratio for assessing a claim of vote dilution. To clear up a dilution declare underneath § 2, consequently, a court docket either should arbitrarily pick a exceptional ratio to represent the "undiluted" norm, a ratio that would have much less intuitive enchantment than direct proportionality, or it should efficiently apply a proportionality check in direct contravention of the textual content of the Act 25-for this reason the "inherent tension" between the textual content of the Act and vote dilution claims. Given that § 2 nowhere speaks in terms of "dilution," an explicit disclaimer putting off from the sector of play the most herbal determining principle in dilution instances is simply a strong signal that such claims do no longer fall inside the ambit of the Act.26

    25 As I talk greater completely under, our cases have pursued the latter option. See infra, at 936-944.

    26 In Johnson v. De Grandy, put up, p. 997, the Court indicates that §2(b) disclaims simplest a guarantee of success for minority applicants and thus that it has not anything to mention regarding remedial schemes designed to offer a minority organization proportional manipulate over seats. See put up, at 1014, n. eleven. See additionally submit, at 1026-1027 (KENNEDY, J., concurring in component and concurring in judgment). Minority manipulate, of direction, mayor may not bring about the election of minority applicants. The Court s analyzing of the disclaimer, for my part, distorts the apparent import of the supply. The clause rejecting a group s proper to go with its personal members in proportion to their numbers have to be understood as a disclaimer of a minority group s proper to proportional political strength. Otherwise, in realistic terms, the clause might be decreased to a nullity.

    It need to be clear that a gadget that offers a minority organization proportional manipulate successfully offers the "right" to go with a proportionate quantity of minority candidates that the Act disclaims. Whether that right is used by minority voters to pick minority applicants is a matter of the electorate preference. The De Grandy Court s position seems to be that the proviso is directed, now not at a device supposed to guarantee the potential to go with minority applicants in percentage to the minority s numbers, however only at a machine that will perpetually guarantee the election of a proportionate quantity of minority applicants. Only one machine would in shape that description: a system primarily based on a racial check in in which a quota of seats are set apart for contributors of a minority institution. I think it would be preposterous


    929

    It is actual that the terms "widespread, exercise, or manner" in § 5 of the Act have been construed to reach districting structures and different potentially dilutive electoral mechanisms, see, e. g., Allen, 393 U. S., at 569, and Congress has reenacted § 5 subsequent to our decisions adopting that expansive interpretation. See, e. g., United States v. Sheffield Bd. of Comm rs, 435 U. S. one hundred ten, 134-one hundred thirty five (1978); Georgia v. United States, 411 U. S. 526, 533 (1973). Nevertheless, the text of the section suggests precisely the equal consciousness on measures that relate to get entry to to the ballot that looks in § 2. Section five calls for covered jurisdictions to attain preclearance for a trade in "any balloting qualification or prerequisite to balloting, or wellknown, practice, or system with appreciate to vote casting." 42 U. S. C. § 1973c. As in § 2, the unique phrases within the list of regulated kingdom movements describe best legal guidelines that would restrict get right of entry to to the ballot . Moreover, § five makes the focal point at the man or woman voter and get entry to to the balloting booth even more apparent because the phase goes directly to nation that "no man or woman shall be denied the right to vote for failure to comply with such qualification, prerequisite, wellknown, exercise, or technique." forty two U. S. C. § 1973c (emphasis introduced). This command makes it explicit that in regulating requirements, practices, or procedures with respect to balloting, "Congress become truly worried with changes in procedure with which

    to suggest that the disclaimer in § 2(b) was supposed completely to restrict using this type of system. Such a device has by no means, to my knowledge, been proposed in any balloting rights case. Moreover, to the volume that the selections in White and Whitcomb can tell our understanding of § 2(b), they propose that during expressing a subject that "proportionality" no longer be used because the degree of a voting rights violation, Congress changed into worried with proportional electoral power, now not merely proportional election of minority applicants. See, e. g., Whitcomb, 403 U. S., at 153 (rejecting the "failure of [the minority group] to have legislative seats in percentage to its populace" as a enough foundation for a declare) (emphasis introduced). The proviso has been understood in the beyond certainly as a disclaimer of a right to proportional illustration, see, e. g., Gingles, 478 U. S., at 84-86,94 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment), and I assume that information is accurate.


    930

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    electorate could comply." Allen, supra, at 587 (Harlan, J., concurring in element and dissenting in component). But it have to be obvious that a districting machine, or every other doubtlessly dilutive mechanism for that remember, isn't some thing with which a voter can comply. As is the case with § 2, § 5 s description of the phrases "preferred, exercise, or procedure" thus suggests a focal point on rules that adjust the individual voter s capacity to register and cast a poll, not a greater abstract subject with the impact that various electoral structures might have at the "weight" of the votes solid by a collection that constitutes a numerical minority inside the voters.

    In my view, the tension between the terms of the Act and the development we've got positioned on § five at least indicates that our interpretation of § five must not be followed wholesale to deliver the meaning of the phrases "general, practice, or procedure" beneath § 2. An expansive construction of § five turned into well set up in 1980, but a plurality of the Court in Bolden, after focusing at the phrases of the Act, did no longer undertake a similarly expansive construction of § 2. Rather, the Bolden plurality concluded that § 2 have to be strictly limited to have the same attain because the Fifteenth Amendment, which the plurality interpreted as addressing simplest subjects referring to get entry to to the ballot . See Bolden, 446 U. S., at sixty one, sixty five. I could reach a comparable result here. Where a cautious reading of the language of § 2 dictates a slim interpretation of the segment, there may be no purpose for transplanting our interpretation of the phrases of § 5-an interpretation that I trust is in anxiety with the text of § 5 itself-to another section of the Act.27

    27 I want now not determine in this example whether or not I could overrule our decisions construing the terms "general, exercise, or process" in § 5; the assignment right here entails best § 2. Although in my view our construction of § five can be incorrect as a count number of first affect, stare decisis could suggest that such an error in earlier selections might not in itself justify overruling settled precedent. Determining whether to abandon prior selections requires weighing a mess of factors, one of the maximum crucial of that is the quantity to which the decisions in query have proved unworkable. Cf. infra, at 936-937. In that regard, even as the realistic


    931

    B

    From the foregoing, it ought to be clean that, as a long way because the textual content of the Voting Rights Act is involved, "§ 2 does not talk in phrases of vote dilution. " Gingles, 478 U. S., at 87 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment). One would possibly marvel, then, why we've got constantly concluded that "[w]e understand that Congress intended to allow vote dilution claims to be introduced below § 2." Id., at 84. The juxtaposition of the 2 statements definitely makes the bring about our instances appear exceptional, since it shows a type of statutory creation through divination that has allowed us to determine that Congress "truly meant" to enact a statute about vote dilution despite the fact that Congress did not achieve this explicitly. In truth, our technique of construing § 2 has been simplest little higher than that, for the handiest source we've got relied upon for the expansive that means we've got given § 2 has been the legislative records of the Act.

    We first considered the amended § 2 in Thornburg v. Gingles. Although the right scope of the terms "widespread, practice, or method" was not mainly addressed if so, Gingles despite the fact that installed our modern interpretation of the amended segment as a provision that addresses vote dilution, and mainly it fixed our understanding that the outcomes test in § 2(b) is supposed to measure vote dilution in terms of electoral effects. See identification., at 93 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) (mentioning that Gingles made electoral results the "linchpin" of vote dilution claims). In reaching its interpretation of § 2, the Gingles Court re-

    variations in the utility of §§ 2 and five that JUSTICE KENNEDY factors out, see ante, at 883-884, would now not, for my part, propose as an authentic count that the identical phrases inside the two sections must be examine to have different meanings, JUSTICE KENNEDY S observations might endorse that specific concerns might have a bearing on the query whether our past interpretations have to be abandoned inside the § five and § 2 contexts. Indeed, in the § five context they may advise a contrary end to the end result I reach below § 2. See infra, at 936-945. That, however, is a question for every other day.


    932

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    jected the argument superior with the aid of america as amicus curiae that § 2(b) s test primarily based on an identical "opportunity ... to take part in the political method and to elect representatives" cautioned a focal point on nothing greater than securing identical get entry to to the political procedure, not a focal point on measuring the influence of a minority institution s votes in terms of electoral results. See Brief for United States as Amicus Curiae in Thornburg v. Gingles, O. T. 1985, No. eighty three-1968, pp. 7-19. That knowledge of § 2 is, of direction, well suited with the translation I have set out above.

    In coming near § 2, the Gingles Court, primarily based on little extra than a bald assertion that "the authoritative supply for legislative intent lies inside the Committee Reports at the invoice," 478 U. S., at 43, n. 7, bypassed a attention of the textual content of the Act and proceeded to interpret the segment based totally almost exclusively on its legislative records.28 It become from the legislative history that the Court culled its expertise that § 2

    28 In imparting two citations to assist the sweeping proposition that committee reviews provide the authoritative source for legislative reason, Gingles evidently misread the import of our prior selections. Far from giving an unqualified endorsement of committee reviews as a manual to congressional motive, the Court in Garcia v. United States, 469 U. S. 70 (1984), simply indicated that, when resort to legislative history is necessary, it's far best committee reports, no longer the various different assets of legislative records, that must be taken into consideration. See id., at 76. The Court, but, carefully repeated Justice Jackson s admonition that "[r]esort to legislative history is only justified wherein the face of the [statute] is inescapably ambiguous." Id., at 76, n. three (quoting Schwegmann Brothers v. Calvert Distillers Corp., 341 U. S. 384, 395 (1951) (concurring opinion)). Similarly, in Zuber v. Allen, 396 U. S. 168 (1969), we considered the reliability of committee reviews handiest as a relative depend in comparing them to statements made by using individual Congressmen during ground debates. See id., at 186.

    Even if I agreed with Justice Jackson that hotel to legislative history is permissible when the text of a statute is "inescapably ambiguous," I couldn't trust the use the Court has manufactured from legislative records in interpreting § 2. I think it's far clear, first, that during interpreting § 2 the Court has by no means undertaken any inquiry into the meaning of the obvious language of the statute to decide whether or not it is ambiguous, and second, that the text of § 2 isn't riddled with such hopeless ambiguity.


    933

    is a provision encompassing claims that an electoral device has diluted a minority group s vote and its understanding that claims of dilution are to be evaluated based totally upon how carefully electoral results beneath a given device approximate the consequences that would reap beneath an alternative, undiluted norm. See, e. g., identity., at forty three-fifty one.

    Contrary to the splendid "legislative records first" technique of statutory production pursued in Gingles, but, I had notion it firmly installed that the "authoritative supply" for legislative cause turned into the textual content of the statute surpassed via each Houses of Congress and presented to the President, not a series of partisan statements approximately purposes and goals accrued through congressional staffers and packaged right into a committee document. "We have said time and again that courts have to presume that a legislature says in a statute what it method and manner in a statute what it says there." Germain, 503 U. S., at 253-254. See additionally United States v. Ron Pair Enterprises, Inc., 489 U. S. 235, 241-242 (1989); Oneale v. Thornton, 6 Cranch 53, sixty eight (1810). Nevertheless, our analysis in Gingles become marked conspicuously through the absence of any try to pursue a near studying of the text of the Act. As mentioned above, had the Court addressed the text, it would have concluded that the phrases of the Act do no longer deal with subjects of vote "dilution."

    Moreover, the legislative history of § 2 itself, and the Court s use of it in Gingles, aptly illustrate that legislative history is frequently used by this Court as "a forensic as opposed to an interpretive device," Wisconsin Public Intervenor v. Mortier, 501 U. S. 597, 621 (1991) (SCALIA, J., concurring in judgment), and is examine selectively to support the end result the Court intends to gain. It is properly documented within the history of the 1982 amendments to the Act that § 2 was exceeded most effective after a compromise turned into reached thru the addition of the availability in § 2(b) disclaiming any right to proportional illustration. See S. Rep. No. 97-417, pp. 2-4 (1982); identification., at ninety four-97 (additional perspectives of Sen. Hatch). But the views of


    934

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    the author of that compromise, Senator Dole, rarely coincide with the gloss the Court has positioned on § 2.

    According to Senator Dole, amended § 2 would "[a]bsolutely not" offer any redress to a group of voters difficult electoral mechanisms in a jurisdiction "if the technique is open, if there may be identical get admission to, if there are not any limitations, direct or oblique, thrown up to hold a person from voting or having their vote counted, or registering, whatever the technique may also consist of." 128 Congo Rec. 14133 (1982). Contrary to the Court s interpretation of the section in Gingles, Senator Dole viewed § 2 as a provision more narrowly targeted on access to the processes surrounding the casting of a poll, now not a provision worried with making sure electoral outcomes according with some "undiluted" norm. See S. Rep. No. 97-417, supra, at 193-194 (extra perspectives of Sen. Dole). The legislative records consequently hardly ever furnished unambiguous aid for the Court s interpretation; indeed, it seems that the Court used what changed into useful to its interpretation inside the legislative records and omitted what turned into not. Cf. Mortier, supra, at 617 (SCALIA, J., concurring in judgment).

    Of route, as referred to above, Gingles did not immediately deal with the meaning of the phrases "widespread, practice, or method" in § 2(a). The understanding that those phrases amplify to a State s legal guidelines establishing numerous electoral mechanisms dates to our selection in Allen, wherein we construed the equal phrases in § five of the Act. But the Court s technique of statutory production in Allen become little exceptional from that pursued in Gingles, and because the evaluation of the text of § five above demonstrates, it further yielded an interpretation in tension with the phrases of the Act.

    In Allen, after noting that § 14(c)(1) defined "voting" to encompass "all action vital to make a vote powerful," 42 U. S. C. § 1973l(c)(1), the Court abandoned any similarly try to construe the textual content of the Act and went on, as a substitute, to conclude that the "legislative history on the whole helps the view that Congress meant to attain any nation


    935

    enactment which altered the election regulation of a protected State in even a minor manner." Allen, 393 U. S., at 566. Not enormously, the legislative history relied upon in Allen also displayed the everyday flaws that one may assume-it became rarely unequivocal. See identification., at 590-591, and n. nine (Harlan, J., concurring in element and dissenting in element) (noting inconsistencies within the legislative records). Thus, to the quantity that Allen implicitly has served as the basis for our next interpretation of the terms of § 2, it rarely may be thought to offer any surer rooting within the language of the Act than the method of statutory construction pursued in Gingles.

    Remarkably, thanks to our reliance on legislative records, we have interpreted § 2 in this type of manner that 4 has memberships of this Court at one time candidly admitted that "[t]here is an inherent tension [in § 2] among what Congress wished to do and what it wanted to avoid." Gingles, 478 U. S., at eighty four (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment). But our information of what Congress purportedly "needed to do" -that is, to allow claims of vote "dilution"-relies upon solely on a selective reading of legislative records, whereas Congress announcement of what it "needed to keep away from" appears explicitly in § 2(b) s disclaimer of a right to proportional illustration. I can see no logical motive to import the "inherent anxiety" between these imperatives into the Act, when on its face the statute consists of most effective one in all two doubtlessly contradictory commands. I might have concept the important thing to resolving one of these war among the text and the legislative records apparent: The text of the statute have to manipulate, and the text of § 2 does no longer amplify the Act to claims of dilution.

    Were it our function to interpret and observe committee reports or different portions of legislative records, in preference to Acts of Congress, I might conclude that we had made the pleasant of a awful state of affairs in interpreting § 2 of the Voting Rights Act, and that the quagmire this is § 2 was Congress creation, not our own. It is obvious, but, that we've got arrived at our cutting-edge knowledge of the Act, with all of its attend-


    936

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    ant pitfalls, best by forsaking proper methods of statutory construction. Our mistakes in approach in past instances normally won't indicate a need to forsake a longtime line of precedent. But right here they've produced an "inherent tension" between our interpretation of § 2 and the text of the Act and feature yielded a production of the statute that, as I discuss beneath, is so unworkable in exercise and destructive in its outcomes that it should be repudiated.

    C

    "Stare decisis isn't an inexorable command," Payne v.

    Tennessee, 501 U. S. 808, 828 (1991). Indeed, "when governing choices are unworkable or are badly reasoned, this Court has never felt restricted to observe precedent." Id., at 827 (internal citation marks not noted). The discussion above need to make clean that our selection in Gingles interpreting the scope of § 2 was badly reasoned; it completely substituted reliance on legislative records for analysis of statutory text. In doing so, it produced a far more expansive interpretation of § 2 than a careful studying of the language of the statute could allow.

    Our interpretation of § 2 has additionally proved unworkable. As I outlined above, it has mired the federal courts in an inherently political undertaking-one which requires answers to questions which might be sick-suited to principled judicial resolution. Under § 2, we've assigned the federal judiciary a undertaking that involves, no longer the utility of prison standards to the facts of diverse cases or even the elaboration of criminal concepts on a case-through-case foundation, but rather the introduction of standards from an summary evaluation of political philosophy.

    Worse, our interpretation of § 2 has required us to distort our decisions to difficult to understand the reality that the political preference at the heart of our cases rests on exactly the principle the Act condemns: proportional allocation of political electricity in keeping with race. Continued adherence to a line of choices that necessitates such dissembling can't possibly promote what


    937

    we have seemed to be one of the crucial values of the policy of stare decisis: the renovation of "the actual and perceived integrity of the judicial procedure." Payne, supra, at 827.

    I even have endeavored to provide an explanation for above that the center of any vote dilution declare is an declaration that the plaintiff organization does no longer maintain seats in the share that it have to.29 There is no logical manner to keep away from reliance on a easy ratio in comparing the sort of claim. And allocation of seats in direct percentage to the minority organization s percent inside the populace affords the maximum logical ratio to apply as an "undiluted" norm. But § 2 makes it clear that the Act does now not create a right to proportional representation, and hence dictates that proportionality should now not provide the rule of thumb of selection for § 2 claims. See supra, at 927-928, and n. 26. Nevertheless, in spite of the statutory command, in finding out claims of vote dilution we've got became to proportionality as a manual, really for loss of any better alternative.

    No components of the test for evaluating vote dilution claims has ever allotted with the inevitable need to seek advice from a mathematical formulation to determine a case. The factors listed in White v. Regester, 412 U. S., at 766-767, resurrected within the Senate Report on the 1982 amendments to § 2, see S. Rep. No. 97-417, at 28-29, and in the end reincorporated into our decision in Gingles, see 478 U. S., at forty four-forty five, although praised in our instances as a multifaceted test ensuring that vote dilution is determined based totally on the "totality of situations," in fact offer no rule for deciding a vote dilution declare based totally on whatever apart from a numerical principle.

    29 I anticipate for functions of the analysis right here that the measure of effective votes is manage of seats. That is exactly the degree the Court has applied, each inside the past, see, e. g., Gingles, 478 U. S., at forty six-51; identity., at ninety three, ninety nine (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) (noting that the Court had made electoral consequences the "linchpin" of dilution claims), and nowadays, see Johnson v. De Grandy, publish, at 1014-1015 (equating "political effectiveness" with manipulate of majority-minority districts).


    938

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    In Gingles, we condensed the import of those "elements" right into a formula declaring that the "essence" of a vote dilution claim under § 2 is that "a certain electoral regulation, practice, or shape interacts with social and historic situations to motive an inequality inside the possibilities loved by using black and white electorate to decide on their desired representatives." Id., at 47. But it need to be obvious that whether an electoral exercise does or does now not lessen the ability of a numerical minority to manipulate the election of representatives may be decided completely with out reference to "social and historical conditions." Ibid. The dilutive consequences of various electoral processes are matters of mathematics. The "social and historical conditions" "interact" with the election mechanism, and accordingly are relevant in a vote dilution case, most effective to the quantity that they may be vital for organising that the minority institution does in truth define a awesome political interest group that could assert that its vote has been diluted by way of the mechanism at problem. Such social and ancient considerations, but, can not supply the solution to the final query whether or not the institution s vote has been diluted.

    In reality, the list of White factors offers not anything greater than simply that: a list of possible considerations that might be consulted by a court attempting to expand a gestalt view of the political and racial weather in a jurisdiction, however a listing that cannot provide a rule for determining a vote dilution declare. Take, for instance, a case wherein a district courtroom determines that a minority group constituting 34% of the population in a positive jurisdiction has suffered discrimination inside the past, that the organization presently bears the effects of that discrimination, and that there has been a records of racial campaigning in the jurisdiction. Cf. White, supra, at 766-767. How can these information in all likelihood answer the question whether the group s votes had been diluted if the institution controls rather than 3 seats in a lO-member governing body? Will the answer to the last question trade if the first elements are observed, however the third isn't always? Obviously, the various "fac-


    939

    tors," singly or in any combination, can not provide a precept for determining the result. What one must know to decide the case is whether or not 20% of the seats in the government is enough to mirror "undiluted" vote casting strength, or if 30% need to be required.

    Of direction, as advised above, the White factors can be relevant to figuring out as a threshold count whether or not the minority organization is a awesome political organization that must be able to assert a declare of dilution. But after Gingles, the inquiry into whether race defines political interest effectively has been boiled right down to the weakened take a look at for minority "political cohesiveness" and majority bloc vote casting embodied inside the 2nd and 1/3 Gingles preconditions. See 478 U. S., at fifty one. Once a plaintiff institution establishes that it's miles mathematically viable for it to control every other seat (this is, that it satisfies the first Gingles precondition of size and geographic compactness), see id., at 50, and that it's far a awesome political group (that is, that it may display political cohesion and majority bloc vote casting), the only query remaining in the vote dilution declare is whether or not the present day number of seats is the proper number or no longer. The other White elements have emerge as essentially superfluous. They may be dutifully intoned through courts performing the empty ritual of applying the "totality of instances" test, however they are able to offer no steering regarding whether the contemporary allocation of seats constitutes "dilution." Cf. Gingles, supra, at ninety two-ninety three (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) (suggesting that the basic contours of a dilution declare require no reference to most of the White elements).

    In brief, it have to be clear that the factors listed in Gingles-in their various incarnations and through something names they are acknowledged-are nothing but puffery used to fill out an impressive verbal method and to create the affect that the outcome in a vote dilution case rests upon a reasoned assessment of numerous applicable instances. The "totality of situations" take a look at mentioned in Gingles for that reason


    940

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    serves to obscure the inherent warfare among the textual content of the Act and an underlying reliance on proportionality.

    The resort to proportionality in our instances have to rarely come as a wonder. Before § 2 was amended in 1982, and therefore before the Act explicitly disavowed a proper to proportional representation, a few has memberships of the Court diagnosed the inevitable glide toward proportional representation that would arise if the test outlined in White have been used to evaluate vote dilution claims. As Justice Stewart, writing for 4 has memberships of the Court, discovered, the elements indexed in White amounted to little extra than "gauzy sociological considerations," and it did now not seem that "they may, in any principled manner, exclude the claims of any discrete political institution that takes place, for anything motive, to pick fewer of its applicants than arithmetic indicates it might." Bolden, 446 U. S., at seventy five, n. 22 (emphasis added). Indeed, Justice Stewart become correct in concluding that "the putative limits [imposed by using the White elements] are certain to show illusory if the explicit cause informing their software would be," as our vote dilution instances have assumed, "to redress the inequitable distribution of political influence." Ibid. (inner citation marks left out).

    In fact, the framework established by means of this Court for comparing vote dilution claims in Gingles changed into at its inception frankly, and in my opinion correctly, categorized as placing a rule of approximately proportional illustration. See Gingles, supra, at 91, 93, ninety seven-ninety nine (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment). Nothing has happened within the intervening years to exchange the fundamental import of the Gingles test. Yet we've got continued to use the equal Gingles framework, see, e. g., Growe v. Emison, 507 U. S. 25 (1993), all of the even as suggesting that we're pursuing simply a "totality of the circumstances" take a look at.

    In any other case decided today, the Court reconfirms the unstated centrality of proportional consequences in an opinion that demonstrates the obfuscation that should come to symbolize our Voting Rights Act rulings if we retain to entertain


    941

    dilution claims even as pretending to give up reliance on proportionality probably of selection. In Johnson v. De Grandy, publish, p. 997, the Court assures us that proportionality does not provide the precept for figuring out vote dilution claims. Post, at 1000, 1017-1021. Rather, the bring about each case need to depend on a looking inquiry into the ever-nebulously defined "totality of situations." Post, at 1000.

    But after the Gingles preconditions were installed, put up, at 1008-1009, and after White factors inclusive of a history of discrimination had been discovered, see submit, at 1013, in which does the Court turn for a finding out principle to present a few which means to these multifarious statistics, which taken for my part might every seem to rely in favor of a locating of vote dilution? Quite clearly, the Court turns to proportionality:

    "Treating equal political possibility as the focus of the enquiry, we do not see how those district traces, seemingly supplying political effectiveness [that is, majority-minority districts] in proportion to balloting-age numbers, deny identical political opportunity." Post, at 1014. See also submit, at 1013 (noting that in assessing "dilutive impact," the "pertinent features" of the districting system at issue "have been majorityminority districts in tremendous proportion to the minority s proportion of voting-age populace"); publish, at 1025 (O CONNOR, J., concurring) (the Court s primary teaching in De Grandy "is that proportionality-defined as the connection among the quantity of majority-minority voting districts and the minority institution s share of the relevant populace-is constantly applicable proof in determining vote dilution"). JUSTICE O CONNOR S comment approximately the Court s keeping in Davis v. Bandemer, 478 U. S. 109 (1986), is equally applicable to the route pursued in De Grandy today: "[The Court s decision] ultimately rests on a political desire for proportionality- ... a conviction that the more the departure from proportionality, the more suspect an apportionment plan becomes." 478 U. S., at 159 (opinion concurring in judgment).


    942

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    To make certain, the De Grandy Court time and again pronounces that proportionality isn't always a protection to a vote dilution claim. See submit, at 1017-1021. That, of path, have to be the said rule if we are not to desert overtly the explicit disclaimer enacted by Congress in § 2(b). But given the Court s equivocationproportionality continues to be constantly relevant-and the Court s last evaluation, such assurances ring hole. The Court makes a decision the question of dilution based upon proportionality. And it's far obvious from the reasons the Court gives for rejecting maximization frequently for choice that proportionality will drive results in future dilution cases as nicely.

    Consider, for instance, the hypothetical rehearsed by means of the Court concerning a jurisdiction with a 10-member elected body and a 40% minority balloting populace. See post, at 1016-1017. Assume that as presently constituted the districting scheme creates 4 majority-minority districts. Even if it is set up on this hypothetical jurisdiction that all of the Gingles elements have been proved (as turned into observed in De Grandy), and that there are each a records of discrimination and continuing discrimination (as was observed in De Grandy), can it's seriously contended that the minority organization can be successful, under any mixture of facts, in bringing a § 2 undertaking to require the advent of the mathematically possible seven majority-minority districts? The Court acknowledges that it'd be "absurd" to assume that § 2 might allow this type of end result. That, after all, would give the group "powerful political energy 75 percentage above its numerical strength"-that is, above its percentage within the population. Post, at 1017 (emphasis introduced). But if it is absurd to present the participants of the group seven seats, why is it not similarly ridiculous to provide them six, or 5? Or, indeed, some thing past the 4 that might secure them seats in proportion to their numbers inside the population?

    If it is absurd to provide contributors of the organization seven seats, this is due to the fact, as the Court tacitly recognizes, we count on that seats in accord with "numerical power" will


    943

    make certain the group "same" "political effectiveness." Thus, intentionally drawing districts with a purpose to give, underneath the assumptions of the hypothetical, forty% of the population manage over 50% of the seats, whilst leaving 60% of the populace with manage of a similar 50% of the seats, could appear to us unfair. Greater deviations from proportionality may also appear greater patently "absurd" than lesser, however the dividing line between what appears fair and what does not remains the same. The riding principle is proportionality.30

    Few words might be too robust to describe the dissembling that pervades the software of the "totality of circumstances" take a look at beneath our interpretation of § 2. It is an empty incantation-an insignificant conjurer s trick that serves to cover the

    30 Of direction, all through this discussion concerning the Court s inevitable lodge to proportionality, I even have assumed that effective votes can be measured in terms of manage of seats. See n. 29, supra. As JUSTICE O CONNOR suggests in her opinion in De Grandy, if we have been to degree the effectiveness of votes no longer without a doubt in phrases of numbers of seats, however in terms of some greater amorphous idea of "access to the political process," there might be no need to make proportionality "dispositive." See De Grandy, publish, at 1026 (O CONNOR, J., concurring). Cf. White, 412 U. S., at 765-766. But Gingles made manipulate of seats the determining thing in dilution claims; this is the degree that has been carried out in instances underneath Gingles, and it stays the measure implemented in exercise in the cases passed down today. In my view, it's far unrealistic to suppose that the Court will now opposite route and set up a few broader information of "political effectiveness" below the "totality of situations" check, after it consistently has pursued a measure of powerful balloting that makes electoral effects the "linchpin" of dilution claims. See 478 U. S., at ninety three (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment).

    Indeed, any change in course is made extra not going via one very realistic attention. As the Court s selection in De Grandy perhaps suggests, measuring political effectiveness by any technique other than counting numbers of seats can unexpectedly come to be a wholly unmanageable mission. As I recommended above, see n. 6, supra, one of the motives the Court seized upon control of seats as a measure of powerful political participation is truly that manage of seats affords the "most easily measured indicia of political power." Bandemer, 478 U. S., at 157 (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment).


    944

    THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment

    pressure for proportionality that animates our selections. As moves consisting of that introduced in Shaw v. Reno, 509 U. S. 630 (1993), have already commenced to expose, what would possibly euphemistically be termed the benign "advent of majority-minority single-member districts to enhance the possibility of minority groups to pick representatives in their desire" might also greater sincerely and more truly be termed "racial gerrymandering." Similarly, what we would call a "totality of circumstances" take a look at to determine whether an electoral exercise "interacts with social and historical conditions to reason an inequality inside the possibilities loved by means of black and white electorate to pick their preferred representatives," Gingles, 478 U. S., at forty seven, might extra correctly be known as a take a look at for making sure proportional electoral effects consistent with race. Cf. id., at ninety seven (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment).

    In my view, our contemporary exercise have to now not keep. Not for every other Term, not until the next case, no longer for every other day. The disastrous implications of the rules we've got adopted underneath the Act are too grave; the dissembling in our approach to the Act too adverse to the credibility of the Federal Judiciary. The "inherent anxiety"-indeed, I might call it an irreconcilable conflict-between the requirements we've got followed for evaluating vote dilution claims and the text of the Voting Rights Act would itself be enough in my view to warrant overruling the interpretation of § 2 set out in Gingles. When that obvious war is mixed with the destructive results our expansive studying of the Act has had in related to the Federal Judiciary within the assignment of dividing the Nation into racially segregated electoral districts, I can see no reasonable opportunity to abandoning our present day unfortunate knowledge of the Act.

    Stare decisis is a powerful concern, in particular inside the field of statutory construction. See Patterson v. McLean Credit Union, 491 U. S. 164, 172 (1989). See also Fogerty v. Fantasy, Inc., 510 U. S. 517, 538-539 (1994) (THOMAS, J., concurring in judgment). But "we've got never implemented stare decisis


    945

    automatically to limit overruling our earlier selections determining the which means of statutes." Monell v. New York City Dept. of Social Servs., 436 U. S. 658, 695 (1978). Stare decisis have to now not bind the Court to an interpretation of the Voting Rights Act that was based on a improper method of statutory production from its inception and that during every day of its continued life entails the Federal Judiciary in tries to difficult to understand the battle among our cases and the express commands of the Act. The Court has noted within the beyond that stare decisis" is a precept of coverage, " Payne, 501 U. S., at 828 (quoting Helvering v. Hallock, 309 U. S. 106, 119 (1940)), and it " is normally the wise coverage, because in most topics it's far more important that the relevant rule of regulation be settled than it's settled proper. 501 U. S., at 827 (quoting Burnet v. Coronado Oil & Gas Co., 285 U. S. 393, 406 (1932) (Brandeis, J., dissenting)). I cannot subscribe to the view that during our decisions under the Voting Rights Act it's far more critical that we have a settled rule than that we've the proper rule. When, beneath our direction, federal courts are engaged in methodically carving the u . s . into racially distinctive electoral districts, it's far vital that we stop to rethink whether the direction we've got charted for the Nation is the one set by way of the humans through their representatives in Congress. I trust it isn't always.

    I can't adhere to the construction of § 2 embodied in our selection in Thornburg v. Gingles. I reject the assumption implicit if so that the phrases "wellknown, practice, or technique" in § 2(a) of the Voting Rights Act can be construed to cover probably dilutive electoral mechanisms. Understood in context, those phrases make bigger the Act s prohibitions simplest to country enactments that alter citizens get admission to to the ballot or the processes for counting a poll. The terms do now not encompass a State s or political subdivision s desire of one districting scheme over another. The phrases clearly do not consist of, as respondents could argue, the size of a local governing authority.


    946

    III

    For the foregoing reasons, I agree with the Court s end that the dimensions of a governing body is not challenge to undertaking beneath § 2 of the Voting Rights Act. I consequently concur in the Court s judgment reversing the judgment beneath and remanding for attention of respondents constitutional declare of intentional discrimination.

    JUSTICE BLACKMUN, with whom JUSTICE STEVENS, JusTICE SOUTER, and JUSTICE GINSBURG be a part of, dissenting.

    Five Justices nowadays agree that the scale of a governing frame is a "standard, practice, or system" under § 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (Act), as amended, 42 U. S. C. § 1973. A one-of-a-kind 5 Justices decide, underneath three separate theories, that voting rights plaintiffs cannot convey § 2 dilution challenges based on size. I, however, trust that the Act, its history, and our very own precedent require us to finish now not best that the dimensions of a governing frame is a "standard, exercise, or process" under § 2, but additionally that minority voters may additionally assignment the dilutive consequences of this practice by means of demonstrating their capacity to opt for representatives under an objectively reasonable alternative exercise. Accordingly, I dissent from the Court s selection that minority citizens can't convey § 2 vote dilution demanding situations primarily based on the dimensions of an existing authorities body.

    I

    Section 2(a) of the Act prohibits the imposition or application of any "vote casting qualification or prerequisite to voting, or widespread, exercise, or method" that "consequences in a denial or abridgement of the right of any citizen of the United States to vote as a consequence of race or colour." forty two U. S. C. § 1973(a) (emphasis added). Section 5 parallels § 2 by means of requiring positive jurisdictions to preclear with the Lawyer General a alternate in "any voting qualification or prerequisite to voting, or preferred, exercise, or system with recognize to vote casting." 42 U. S. C. § 1973c (emphasis added). Under the huge inter-


    947

    pretation that this Court, Congress, and the Lawyer General constantly have given the Act in popular and § 5 in particular, the exercise of electing a single commissioner, instead of a multimember fee, constitutes a "general, exercise, or method" under § 2.

    Nearly 30 years of precedent admonish us that the Act, which was followed "for the broad remedial motive of rid[ding] the country of racial discrimination in balloting, " Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380, 403 (1991), quoting South Carolina v. Katzenbach, 383 U. S. 301, 315 (1966), must take delivery of "the broadest viable scope," Allen v. State Bd. of Elections, 393 U. S. 544, 567 (1969). Because "the Act itself nowhere amplifies the meaning of the word popular, exercise, or procedure with recognize to balloting, " the Court "ha[s] sought guidance from the history and cause of the Act." Dougherty County Bd. of Ed. v. White, 439 U. S. 32, 37 (1978); see additionally McCain v. Lybrand, 465 U. S. 236, 246 (1984) (the Act have to "be interpreted in light of its prophylactic motive and the ancient revel in which it reflects").

    Consistent with the Act s remedial functions, this Court has held that a huge style of election- and balloting-associated practices suit inside the term "widespread, practice, or system." Among the covered practices are the annexation of land to extend city barriers, see Perkins v. Matthews, four hundred U. S. 379, 388 (1971), and Pleasant Grove v. United States, 479 U. S. 462, 467 (1987); a rule requiring personnel to take leaves of absence whilst they marketing campaign for non-obligatory office, see Dougherty County Bd. of Ed., 439 U. S., at 34; candidate filing dates and other procedural requirements, see Whitley v. Williams, determined with Allen v. State Bd. of Elections, supra; Hadnott v. Amos, 394 U. S. 358, 365 (1969); NAACP v. Hampton County Election Comm n, 470 U. S. 166, 176-177 (1985); and candidate residency requirements, see City of Rome v. United States, 446 U. S. 156, one hundred sixty (1980).

    Specifically, this Court long has dealt with a exchange in the size of a governing authority as a alternate in a "widespread,


    948

    practice, or manner" with admire to vote casting. In City of Rome, 446 U. S., at 161, it referred to that it "isn't disputed" that an growth within the size of a board of education was "inside the purview of the Act" and issue to preclearance below § 5. In City of Lockhart v. United States, 460 U. S. one hundred twenty five, 131 (1983), it stated that a change from a three-member commission to a five-member commission become difficulty to § 5 preclearance. And, most currently, it stated that the term "trendy, exercise, or system with admire to voting" blanketed a alternate inside the length of a governing authority or an increase or decrease inside the variety of elected workplaces. Presley v. Etowah County Comm n, 502 U. S. 491, 500 (1992).

    This conclusion flowed obviously from the holding in Bunton v. Patterson, 393 U. S. 544 (1969), that a trade from an elected to an appointed workplace changed into a "trendy, exercise, or manner with admire to vote casting." In Bunton, the Court reasoned that the power of a citizen s vote is stricken by the change because the citizen has been "prohibited from electing an officer formerly concern to the approval of the electorate." Id., at 570. The reverse is also actual: A trade from an appointed to an elected office affects a citizen s vote casting electricity by using growing the variety of officials for whom he may also vote. See McCain v. Lybrand, 465 U. S. 236 (1984). And, because the Court diagnosed in Presley, a exchange within the length of a governing authority is a "widespread, practice, or system with admire to balloting" because the exchange "boom[s] or lessen[es] the range of officers for whom the electorate can also vote," 502 U. S., at 503; this change bears "at the substance of balloting electricity" and has "a right away relation to balloting and the election manner." Ibid.

    To date, our precedent has dealt with § 5 demanding situations to a exchange in the size of a governing authority, as opposed to § 2 demanding situations to the present size of a governing body. I trust JUSTICE O CONNOR, ante, at 886-887, that, as a textual be counted, "standard, exercise, or process" underneath § 2 is at


    949

    least as large as "standard, exercise, or manner with appreciate to voting" under § 5. In reality, because of the "close connection" between §§ 2 and 5, we interpret them similarly. See Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S., at 402 (concluding that it'd be "anomalous" to do otherwise). And in the context of § 2, the Court stated: "Section 2 included the proper to vote, and it did so without making any differences or imposing any barriers as to which elections might fall inside its purview." Id., at 392. See additionally Houston Lawyers Assn. v. Lawyer General of Tex., 501 U. S. 419 (1991) (rejecting a "unmarried-member-workplace" exception to § 2).

    Congress time and again has recommended the broad creation this Court has given the Act in wellknown and § five particularly.1 Significantly, while Congress taken into consideration the 1982 amendments to the Voting Rights Act, it made no effort to curtail the software of § five to adjustments in size, in the face of the longstanding practice of submitting such adjustments for preclearance, and on the heels of this Court s popularity simply years earlier that it changed into "now not disputed" that a exchange within the size of a governing frame became blanketed under § five. See City of Rome, 446 U. S., at 161. Similarly, the Lawyer General, whose creation of the Act "is entitled to huge deference," NAACP v. Hampton County Election Comm n, 470 U. S., at 178-179, for years has required §five preclearance of the expansion or discount of a governing

    1 See Georgia v. United States, 411 U. S. 526, 533 (1973) ("After full-size deliberations in 1970 on payments to extend the Voting Rights Act, for the duration of which the Allen case was time and again mentioned, the Act changed into prolonged for 5 years, without any major modification of § 5") (footnote neglected); Dougherty County Ed. of Ed. v. White, 439 U. S. 32, 39 (1978) ("Again in 1975, each the House and Senate Judiciary Committees, in recommending extension of the Act, cited with approval the extensive interpretations to the scope of Section 5 in Allen and Perkins v. Matthews [four hundred U. S. 379 (1971)]"); NAACP v. Hampton County Election Comm n, 470 U. S. 166, 176 (1985) (in the 1982 extension of the Act, "Congress particularly encouraged a extensive creation" of § five).


    950

    frame.2 It isn't always surprising that no celebration to this case argued that the dimensions of a governing authority isn't always a "preferred, exercise, or manner."

    In mild of this constant and expansive interpretation of the Act with the aid of this Court, Congress, and the Lawyer General, the Act s "all-inclusive" definition of "widespread, practice, or system" can't be study to exclude threshold insurance of challenges to the scale of a governing authority. As 5 has memberships of the Court today agree, the scale of a governing authority is a "standard, practice, or procedure" with admire to balloting for functions of § 2 as well as § five of the Voting Rights Act.

    II

    Although 5 Justices agree that the dimensions of a governing frame is a "widespread, exercise, or technique" under § 2, a like variety of Justices conclude, below varying rationales, that Voting Rights plaintiffs though can not bring length challenges below § 2. This end is inconsistent with our precedent giving the Act " the broadest possible scope in preventing racial discrimination," Chisom, 501 U. S., at 403, quoting Allen, 393 U. S., at 567, and with the vote-dilution

    2 See Hearings on S. 1992 before the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, 97th Cong., 2d Sess., 1748 (1982) (noting Lawyer General s objection in 1971 to proposed reduction in the size of a faculty board); id., at 1751 (1971 objection to growth of a parish council); id., at 1782 (1980 objection to decrease in wide variety of town council individuals); identity., at 1384-1385 (the Voting Rights Act afforded safety towards "[s]hifts from ward to at-large elections, from plurality win to majority vote, from slating to numbered posts, annexations and changes in the size of electoral our bodies," that "may want to ... deprive minority voters of honest and effective approaches for electing candidates in their preference") (statement of Drew S. Days III, former Assistant Lawyer General for Civil Rights) (emphasis added).

    Since included jurisdictions mechanically have submitted adjustments within the size in their legislative bodies for preclearance, it isn't surprising that petitioners concede that a alternate in the length of the Bleckley County Commission could be subject to § five preclearance. Tr. of Oral Arg. 4, 13.


    951

    evaluation prescribed in Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30 (1986).

    To be successful in a vote-dilution challenge, minority voters need to show that they "own the potential to decide on representatives in the absence of the challenged structure or practice." Id., at 50, n. 17 (2d emphasis provided).3 There is vast agreement, see ante, at 880 (opinion of KENNEDY, J., and REHNQUIST, C. J.); ante, at 887 (opinion of O CONNOR, J.), that minority citizens capability "within the absence of" the allegedly dilutive mechanism should be measured in opposition to the benchmark of an opportunity structure or exercise that is affordable and conceivable beneath the information of the particular case.four

    By all goal measures, the proposed five-member Bleckley County Commission offers an inexpensive, potential benchmark in opposition to which to degree the practice of electing a sole commissioner. First, the Georgia Legislature specifically authorized a 5-member commission for Bleckley County. 1985 Ga. Laws 4406. Moreover, a fivemember fee is the maximum common shape of governing authority in Georgia. See Georgia Dept. of Community Af-

    three Although Gingles dealt with using multimember districts, the evaluation it prescribes is relevant in positive different vote-dilution contexts, which include a declare of "vote fragmentation" through single-member districts, see Growe v. Emison, 507 U. S. 25, 37-42 (1993), or the case earlier than us.

    4 As the United States explains, the minority group should be authorised to establish that, beneath "a proposed alternative vote casting association that is reasonable inside the criminal and factual context of a particular case," it can represent a majority. Brief for United States as Amicus Curiae 8. The Court of Appeals followed this technique, concluding that "it's miles appropriate to recollect the dimensions and geographical compactness of the minority group within a restructured form of the challenged system whilst the current shape is being challenged as dilutive" (emphasis in unique). 955 F.2d 1563, 1569 (CAll 1992). See also Carrollton Branch of NAACP v. Stallings, 829 F.second 1547 (CAll 1987) (remand of undertaking to solecommissioner system with instructions to take into account length and geographic compactness within proposed 3- and five-member commission types of government).


    952

    festivals, County Government Information Catalog (1989) (Table 1.A: Form of Government) (76 of Georgia s 159 counties had five commissioners, such as 25 counties smaller than Bleckley County). Bleckley County, as certainly one of a small and dwindling variety of counties in Georgia nevertheless using a sole commissioner, markedly departs from practices some place else in Georgia. This marked "depart[ure] ... from practices some other place in the jurisdiction ... bears at the fairness of [the sole commissioner s] effect." S. Rep. No. ninety seven-417, p. 29, n. 117 (1982). Finally, the county itself has moved from a single superintendent of training to a school board with 5 members elected from single-member districts, presenting a possible and without difficulty to be had version for commission districts. Thus, the proposed 5-member baseline is reasonable and manageable.

    In this case, identifying the suitable baseline against which to measure dilution is not tough. In different instances, it could be tougher. But the need to make tough judgments does now not "justify a judicially created trouble on the coverage of the extensively worded statute, as enacted and amended by way of Congress." Chisom, 501 U. S., at 403. Vote dilution is inherently a relative idea, requiring a particularly "flexible, truth-in depth" inquiry, Gingles, 478 U. S., at forty six, and calling for an workout of the "court docket s normal judgment, based totally at the totality of occasions and guided via those applicable elements in the unique case," as mandated via Congress. S. Rep. No. ninety seven-417, at 29, n. 118. Certainly judges who interact within the complicated venture of comparing reapportionment plans and examining district strains may be able to determine whether or not a proposed baseline is an appropriate one towards which to degree a declare of vote dilution based totally on the dimensions of a county fee.

    There are, to make certain, huge constraints on length challenges. Minority plaintiffs, who endure the burden of demonstrating dilution, also undergo the load of demonstrating that


    953

    their proposed benchmark is affordable and conceivable. One indication of a benchmark s reasonableness is its grounding in history, custom, or exercise. This attention will discourage length challenges to conventional unmarried-member government workplaces, including governors and mayors, or even sheriffs or clerks of court. By lifestyle and practice, these executive positions are occupied by using one individual, so plaintiffs ought to not often factor to an objectively reasonable opportunity size that has any foundation inside the beyond or gift. Cf. The Federalist No. 69, p. 415 (C. Rossiter ed. 1961) (A. Hamilton) ("[T]he executive authority, with few exceptions, is to be vested in a unmarried magistrate"). The sole commissioner, by evaluation, holds plenary legislative, in addition to govt, electricity. Ga. Code Ann. § 36-5-22.1 (1993). A one-member legislature, a ways from being the norm, is an anomaly. Accordingly, the Eleventh Circuit, at the same time as allowing § 2 demanding situations to the exercise of electing a sole commissioner, has held that this provision cannot be used to regulate the exercise of electing a unmarried person to places of work together with lieutenant governor, sheriff, probate judge, and tax collector. See Dillard v. Crenshaw County, 831 F.second 246, 251 (1987); United States v. Dallas County Comm n, 850 F.2d 1430, 1432, n. 1 (1988), cert. denied, 490 U. S. 1030 (1989).5

    Additionally, each a hit vote-dilution task may be based on the "totality of the circumstances," regularly such as the lingering consequences of beyond discrimination. S. Rep. No. ninety seven-417, at 28-30. Not each racial or language minority that constitutes five% of the populace has a declare to have a governing authority accelerated to 20 members so that you can supply them an opportunity to opt for a representative. Instead, the electorate would must show that a 20-

    5 Of path, this is not to suggest that single-member government offices aren't within the scope of §2, see Houston Lawyers Assn. v. Lawyer General of Tex., 501 U. S. 419, 425-428 (1991), but most effective that they're no longer commonly susceptible to size demanding situations below § 2.


    954

    member governing authority was a reasonable benchmarkwhich, of course, respondents could not do right here-and that their claim happy the 3 Gingles preconditions, 478 U. S., at 49, and changed into warranted below the totality of the circumstances.6

    6 The Senate Report accompanying the 1982 amendments to the Act directed that the vote-dilution inquiry consist of an examination of the factors diagnosed in White v. Regester, 412 U. S. 755 (1973), and refined and developed in Zimmer v. McKeithen, 485 F.second 1297 (CA5 1973) (en banc), aff d, 424 U. S. 636 (1976) (consistent with curiam). This nonexclusive listing of factors, now recognised variously because the Regester-Zimmer factors or "Senate Report elements," consists of "the volume of any records of reputable discrimination ... that touched the proper of the contributors of the minority group to check in, to vote, or in any other case to take part in the democratic system; ... the volume to which the country or political subdivision has used unusually big election districts, majority vote requirements, anti-single shot provisions, or different balloting practices or procedures that could beautify the possibility for discrimination in opposition to the minority institution; ... [and] the volume to which contributors of the minority group within the nation or political subdivision endure the outcomes of discrimination in such regions as education, employment and fitness, which restrict their ability to take part efficiently within the political technique." S. Rep. No. ninety seven-417, pp. 28-29 (1982).

    In this situation, for instance, the District Court found that, until the passage of federal civil rights legal guidelines, Bleckley County "enforced racial segregation in all elements of nearby authorities-courthouse, jails, public housing, governmental offerings-and disadvantaged its black residents of the possibility to take part in neighborhood authorities." Hall v. Holder, 757 F. Supp. 1560, 1562 (MD Ga. 1991). Until the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, "black residents have been surely prohibited from registering to vote in Bleckley County." Id., at 1563. Until 1984, there were no African-American vote casting registrars and no voter registration in places in which MricanAmericans typically congregated. Ibid. From 1978 until 1986, the respondent probate judge appointed 224 poll managers, all white, and 509 ballot clerks, 479 of whom were white. Ibid. Since 1964, the election of Bleckley County s sole commissioner has been difficulty to a majority-vote requirement. Although authentic segregation is no longer imposed, its vestiges remain, as "greater black than white citizens of Bleckley County preserve to endure a depressed socio-monetary popularity," identification., at 1562, which "hinders the capacity of and deters black citizens of Bleckley County from running for public office, vote casting and otherwise participating in the political


    955

    With those limitations, a hit vote-dilution challenges to the dimensions of a governing authority always will be based now not on abstract manipulation of numbers, however on a "looking practical evaluation of the past and present truth. " S. Rep. No. 97-417, at 30, quoting White v. Regester, 412 U. S. 755, 770 (1973). These obstacles guard in opposition to a proliferation of vote-dilution demanding situations premised on eccentric or impracticable opportunity techniques of redistricting.

    III

    The Voting Rights Act of 1965 changed into ambitious and ambitious legislation, designed to get rid of the vestiges of past discrimination and to make individuals of racial and language minorities full contributors in American political existence. Nearly 30 years after the passage of this landmark civil rights legislation, its desires remain unfulfilled. Today, the most blatant varieties of discrimination-which include ballot taxes, literacy exams, and "white" primaries-have been eliminated. But subtler, greater complex means of infringing minority balloting energy-consisting of submergence or dispersion of minority voters-are still gift and indeed ordinary. We have recognized over the years that reputedly harmless or even well-intentioned election practices can also obstruct minority voters ability not only to vote, but to have their votes count number. It is clear that the exercise of electing a unmarried-member county commission can be one such dilutive practice. It is similarly clean that a 5-member fee is the suitable benchmark in opposition to which to degree the alleged dilutive results of Bleckley County s exercise of electing a sole commissioner. I respectfully dissent.

    system," identification., at 1563. The "boundaries to active participation in the political manner are ... compounded through the truth that Bleckley County now has most effective one vote casting precinct for the entire 219 rectangular-mile place." Id., at 1563, n. three. That unmarried polling place is located at an all-white civic club. 955 F.2d 1563, 1566 (CAll 1992).


    956

    JUSTICE GINSBURG, dissenting.

    I be a part of the dissenting opinion with the aid of JUSTICE BLACKMUN and the separate opinion of JUSTICE STEVENS, and add a similarly commentary about the obligation Congress has given to the judiciary.

    Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 requires an inquiry into "[t]he volume to which participants of a included magnificence have been elected to office," but concurrently disclaims any "proper to have participants of a included class elected in numbers equal to their percentage within the populace." 42 U. S. C. § 1973(b). "There is an inherent tension among what Congress needed to do and what it needed to avoid"-between Congress "inten[t] to permit vote dilution claims to be introduced underneath § 2" and its motive to avoid "creat[ing] a proper to proportional representation for minority electorate." Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30, 84 (1986) (O CONNOR, J., joined via Burger, C. J., and Powell and REHNQUIST, JJ., concurring in judgment). Tension of this kind is hardly precise to the Voting Rights Act, for when Congress acts on problems on which its constituents are divided, sometimes bitterly, the give-and-take of legislative compromise can yield statutory language that fails to reconcile conflicting dreams and functions.

    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, for example, is in addition janus faced, prohibiting discrimination against historically disadvantaged businesses, see 42 U. S. C. §§ 2000e-2(a), (d), with out "decrease[ing] traditional control prerogatives," Steelworkers v. Weber, 443 U. S. 193, 207 (1979), in regard to employment selections. See 42 U. S. C. § 2000e2(j) (no requirement that enterprise "provide preferential remedy to any man or woman or to any group due to ... race, shade, faith, sex, or countrywide starting place"); see also Johnson v. Transportation Agency, Santa Clara Cty., 480 U. S. 616, 649 (1987) (O CONNOR, J., concurring in judgment) (noting "conflicting worries" constructed into Title VII: "Congress reason


    957

    to root out invidious discrimination against any person on the basis of race or gender, and its goal of disposing of the lasting consequences of discrimination towards minorities") (emphasis in original) (citation unnoticed).

    When courts are faced with congressionally crafted compromises of this type, it's miles "not an clean venture" to remain "faithful to the stability Congress struck." Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S., at 84 (O CONNOR, J., joined by using Burger, C. J., and Powell and REHNQUIST, JJ., concurring in judgment). The statute s huge remedial purposes, as well as the restrictions on the courts remedial powers, need to be cautiously considered in mild of the specific occasions of every case to reach at the ideal resolution of the competing congressional concerns. However hard this challenge may additionally show to be, it's far one which courts need to undertake because it's far their challenge to effectuate Congress a couple of functions as nice they can. See Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380, 403 (1991) ("Even if serious troubles lie in advance in making use of the totality of the situations [inquiry under § 2(b) of the Voting Rights Act], that challenge, hard as it could show to be, can not justify a judicially created difficulty at the coverage of the broadly worded statute[.]").

    Separate opinion of JUSTICE STEVENS, in which JUSTICE BLACKMUN, JUSTICE SOUTER, and JUSTICE GINSBURG join.

    JUSTICE THOMAS has written a separate opinion offering that the terms "standard, exercise, or technique" as used in the Voting Rights Act of 1965 need to henceforth be construed to refer simplest to practices that affect minority citizens get admission to to the ballot . Specifically, JUSTICE THOMAS would now not interpret the Act to forbid practices that dilute minority balloting electricity. To the extent that his opinion advances coverage arguments in choose of that interpretation of the statute, it should be addressed to Congress, which has enough strength to amend the statute. To the quantity that the opinion


    958

    Opinion of STEVENS, J.

    indicates that federal judges have an obligation to enroll in the proposed slender reading of statutory language, it is suitable to complement JUSTICE THOMAS writing with a few phrases of records.

    I

    JUSTICE THOMAS notes that the primary technology of Voting Rights Act cases centered on get admission to to the poll. Ante, at 894-895. By doing so, he indicates that the early pattern of enforcement is a sign of the unique meaning of the statute. In this regard, it's miles important to observe that the Court s first case addressing a vote casting exercise other than get admission to to the ballot arose under the Fifteenth Amendment. In Gomillion v. Lightfoot, 364 U. S. 339 (1960), the Court held that a exchange within the boundaries of the city of Tuskegee, Alabama, violated the Fifteenth Amendment. In his opinion for the Court, Justice Frankfurter wrote:

    "The opposite conclusion, advised upon us by using respondents, would sanction the fulfillment by using a State of any impairment of voting rights some thing see you later as it turned into cloaked within the garb of the realignment of political subdivisions." Id., at 345.

    "A statute which is claimed to have worked unconstitutional deprivations of petitioners rights isn't proof against assault really due to the fact the mechanism employed by the legislature is a redefinition of municipal obstacles. According to the allegations here made, the Alabama Legislature has not simply redrawn the Tuskegee metropolis limits with incidental inconvenience to the petitioners; it is extra correct to mention that it has disadvantaged the petitioners of the municipal franchise and consequent rights and to that quit it has by the way changed the city s boundaries. While in form that is simply an act redefining metes and bounds, if the allegations are hooked up, the inescapable human impact of this essay in geometry and geography is to despoil colored residents,


    959

    and most effective colored citizens, of their theretofore loved voting rights." Id., at 347.1

    Because Gomillion became decided only a few years before the Voting Rights Act of 1965 changed into handed, and because insurance under the Voting Rights Act is normally coextensive with or broader than insurance beneath the Fifteenth Amendment, see Katzenbach v. Morgan, 384 U. S. 641 (1966); Mobile v. Bolden, 446 U. S. 55, 60-sixty one (1980) (plurality opinion), it's miles sincerely not unreasonable to deduce that Congress supposed the Act to reach the sort of balloting exercise that became at difficulty in that case. Nevertheless, the textual content of the Act could additionally have supported the opposite inference, due to the fact the language of the Fifteenth Amendment could appear to forbid any denial or abridgment of the right to vote, whereas §§ 2 and five of the Voting Rights Act refer only to "vote casting qualification[s,] ... prerequisite[s] to vote casting, ... wellknown [s], exercise[s], [and] process[s]."

    During the years among 1965 and 1969 the question whether or not the Voting Rights Act ought to be narrowly construed to cowl nothing more than impediments to get right of entry to to the poll became an unresolved difficulty. What JUSTICE THOMAS describes as "a fundamental shift within the focal point of the Act," ante, at 895, happened in 1969 when the Court unequivocally rejected the slim analyzing, relying closely on a huge

    1 In maximum of his opinion, JUSTICE THOMAS seems to use the phrase "get right of entry to to the poll" to consult the voter s capability to forged a vote. In an try and represent the Gomillion gerrymander as a practice that interfered with get entry to to the poll, however, he appears to take the location that the redrawing of the bounds of a governmental unit is a exercise that impacts get admission to to the poll because a few electorate ballots could not thereafter be cast for the identical places of work as before. See ante, at 920, n. 20. Under such reasoning the substitution of an appointive workplace for an non-obligatory office, see Bunton v. Patterson, determined with Allen v. State Bd. of Elections, 393 U. S. 544, 550-551 (1969), or a change in district obstacles that prevented electorate from casting ballots for the reelection in their incumbent congressional Representatives, would additionally be blanketed practices.


    960

    Opinion of STEVENS, J.

    definition of the term "voting" as consisting of" all motion vital to make a vote effective. " Allen v. State Bd. of Elections, 393 U. S. 544, 565-566.

    Despite Allen s purported deviation from the Act s proper meaning, Congress twelve months later reenacted § five with out in any manner converting the operative phrases. During the following 5 years, the Court consistently adhered to Allen, see Perkins v. Matthews, four hundred U. S. 379 (1971); Georgia v. United States, 411 U. S. 526 (1973), and in 1975, Congress once more reenacted § 5 without exchange.

    When, within the late seventies, a few parties endorsed a slender studying of the Act, the Court pointed to those congressional reenactments as stable proof that Allen, even if not efficiently decided in 1969, would now be virtually correct. In United States v. Sheffield Bd. of Comm rs, 435 U. S. 110, 132133 (1978), the Court referred to:

    "In 1970, Congress changed into definitely fully privy to this Court s interpretation of § 5 as attaining voter modifications aside from the ones affecting the registration manner and it appears that evidently contemplated that the Act would continue to be so construed. See, e. g., Hearings on H. R. 4249 et al. before Subcommittee No.five of the House Committee at the Judiciary, 91st Cong., 1st Sess., 1, four, 18,83, a hundred thirty-131, 133,147-149,154-one hundred fifty five,182-184,402-454(1969); Hearings on S. 818 et al. earlier than the Subcommittee on Constitutional Rights of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, 91st Cong., 1st and 2d Sess., 48, 195-196, 369-370, 397398, 426-427, 469 (1970) ....

    "The congressional records is even clearer with appreciate to the 1975 extension .... " 2

    2 See also United Jewish Organizations of Williamsburgh, Inc. v. Carey, 430 U. S. one hundred forty four, 157-159 (1977) (opinion of White, J.): "In Allen v. State Board of Elections[, 393 U. S. 544 (1969),] ... we held that a exchange from district to at-large balloting for county supervisors needed to be submitted for federal approval under § 5, due to the capacity for a dilution of minority vote casting energy that could nullify [its] ability to elect the candidate of [its]


    961

    As the Court if so also referred to, whilst Congress reenacts a statute with information of its earlier interpretation, that interpretation is binding on the Court.

    "Whatever one would possibly consider the other arguments superior, the legislative heritage of the 1975 reenactment is conclusive of the query before us. When a Congress that re-enacts a statute voices its approval of an administrative or other interpretation thereof, Congress is handled as having adopted that interpretation, and this Court is bound thereby. See, e. g., Don E. Williams Co. v. Commissioner, 429 U. S. 569,576-577 (1977); Albemarle Paper Co. v. Moody, 422 U. S. 405, 414 n. eight (1975); H. Hart & A. Sacks, The Legal Process: Basic Problems within the Making and Application of Law 1404 (tent. ed. 1958); cf. Zenith Radio Corp. v. Hazeltine Research, 401 U. S. 321, 336 n. 7 (1971); Girouard v. United States, 328 U. S. sixty one, sixty nine-70 (1946). Don E. Williams Co. v. Commissioner, supra, is instructive. As here, there were a longstanding administrative interpretation of a statute when Congress re-enacted it, and there, as right here, the legislative records of the reenactment confirmed that Congress agreed with that inter-

    desire ... . 393 U. S., at 569. When it renewed the Voting Rights Act in 1970 and again in 1975, Congress turned into properly privy to the application of § 5 to redistricting. In its 1970 extension, Congress relied on findings via the USA Commission on Civil Rights that the newly received balloting power of minorities became in threat of being diluted through redistricting plans that divided minority groups among predominantly white districts. In 1975, Congress became unmistakably cognizant of this new segment in the attempt to dispose of balloting discrimination. Former Lawyer General Katzenbach testified that § five has had its broadest impact ... inside the regions of redistricting and reapportionment, and the Senate and House Reports recommending the extension of the Act referred especially to the Lawyer General s position in screening redistricting plans to shield the possibilities for nonwhites to be elected to public workplace" (footnote left out).


    962

    Opinion of STEVENS, J.

    pretation, leading this Court to finish that Congress had ratified it. 429 U. S., at 574-577." Id., at 134-135.

    If the 1970 and 1975 reenactments had left any doubt as to congressional intent, that doubt would be set apart by means of the 1982 amendments to § 2. Between 1975 and 1982, the Court persisted to interpret the Voting Rights Act within the extensive manner set out with the aid of Allen. See City of Rome v. United States, 446 U. S. 156 (1980); Dougherty County Bd. of Ed. v. White, 439 U. S. 32 (1978); United Jewish Organizations of Williamsburgh, Inc. v. Carey, 430 U. S. 144 (1977); Richmond v. United States, 422 U. S. 358 (1975). In Mobile v. Bolden, 446 U. S. fifty five (1980), a plurality of this Court concluded that violations of each the Voting Rights Act and the Fifteenth Amendment required discriminatory motive. The case worried a claim that at-huge balloting diluted minority balloting strength. In his opinion for the plurality in Bolden, Justice Stewart expressly relied upon Gomillion v. Lightfoot s keeping "that allegations of a racially motivated gerrymander of municipal obstacles stated a declare beneath the Fifteenth Amendment." 446 U. S., at sixty two; see also identity., at eighty five-86 (STEVENS, J., concurring in judgment). The simplest reason Gomillion did no longer manage the outcome in Bolden become that an "invidious reason" had been alleged in the earlier case but no longer in Bolden. 446 U. S., at sixty three.three The congressional reaction to Bolden is acquainted history. In the 1982 modification to § 2 of the Voting Rights Act, Congress substituted a "consequences" test for an rationale requirement. Pub. L. 97-205, § three, 96 Stat. 134; see 42 U. S. C. § 1973. It is crystal

    three The concept that the Court in Bolden forged doubt on whether or not the Voting Rights Act reached diluting practices is flatly refuted by way of some other decision passed down the very identical day because the Bolden decision. In City of Rome v. United States, 446 U. S. 156, 186-187 (1980), the Court held that § 5 required preclearance of annexations doubtlessly diluting minority vote casting electricity. Even the dissenters did no longer advise that vote dilution claims have been now questionable.


    963

    clear that Congress meant the 1982 modification to cowl nonaccess claims like those in Bolden and Gomillion.4

    II

    JUSTICE THOMAS narrow interpretation of the words "voting qualification ... preferred, practice, or technique," if adopted, might require us to overrule Allen and the cases which have adhered to its reading of the critical statutory language. The radical individual of that advised interpretation is illustrated by using the subsequent passage from an opinion decided best 9 years after Allen:

    "The Court s choices over the last 10 years have given § five the wide scope cautioned by way of the language of the Act. We first construed it in Allen v. State Board of Elections, [393 U. S. 544 (1969)]. There our exam of the Act s goals and authentic legislative history led us to interpret § 5 to offer it the broadest viable scope, 393 U. S., at 567, and to require earlier federal scrutiny of any state enactment which altered the election regulation in a blanketed State in even a minor manner. Id., at 566. In so construing § five, we unanimously rejectedas the obvious phrases of the Act could themselves have apparently required-the argument of an appellee that § five need to apply most effective to enactments affecting who may register to vote. 393 U. S., at 564. Our selections have required federal preclearance of legal guidelines changing the place of polling locations, see Perkins v. Matthews, 400 U. S.

    4 We lately confirmed that interpretation of the 1982 change, stating: "Moreover, there is absolute confidence that the terms wellknown, exercise, or procedure are large enough to embody using multimember districts to reduce a racial minority s capability to influence the outcome of an election blanketed by using § 2." Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380, 390 (1991). Though disagreeing with the Court s protecting that the statute included judicial elections, even the dissenters in that case agreed that the amended § 2 "extends to vote dilution claims for the elections of representatives .... " Id., at 405.


    964

    Opinion of STEVENS, J.

    379 (1971), laws adopting at-big systems of election, ibid.; Fairley v. Patterson (determined with Allen, supra); legal guidelines offering for the appointment of previously elected officials, Bunton v. Patterson (decided with Allen, supra); legal guidelines regulating candidacy, Whitley v. Williams (determined with Allen, supra); laws changing voting processes, Allen, supra; annexations, City of Richmond v. United States, 422 U. S. 358 (1975); City of Petersburg v. United States, 410 U. S. 962 (1973), summarily aff g 354 F. Supp. 1021 (DC 1972); Perkins v. Matthews, supra; and reapportionment and redistricting, Beer v. United States, 425 U. S. 130 (1976); Georgia v. United States, 411 U. S. 526 (1973); see United Jewish Organizations v. Carey, 430 U. S. a hundred and forty four (1977). In every case, federal scrutiny of the proposed exchange changed into required due to the fact the exchange had the capacity to deny or dilute the rights conferred through § 4(a)." United States v. Sheffield Bd. ofComm rs, 435 U. S., at 122-123 (footnote left out).

    The Allen interpretation of the Act has additionally been accompanied in a bunch of instances determined in later years, among them Houston Lawyers Assn. v. Lawyer General of Tex., 501 U. S. 419 (1991); Pleasant Grove v. United States, 479 U. S. 462 (1987); Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30 (1986); Port Arthur v. United States, 459 U. S. 159 (1982); City of Rome v. United States, 446 U. S. 156 (1980); Dougherty County Bd. of Ed. v. White, 439 U. S. 32 (1978). In addition, JUSTICE THOMAS interpretation could call into question the numerous other cases given that 1978 which have assumed the vast coverage of the Voting Rights Act that JUSTICE THOMAS might now have us reject. Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380 (1991); Clark v. Roemer, 500 U. S. 646 (1991); McCain v. Lybrand, 465 U. S. 236 (1984); Hathorn v. Lovorn, 457 U. S. 255 (1982); Blanding v. DuBose, 454 U. S. 393 (1982); McDaniel v. Sanchez, 452 U. S. 130 (1981); Berry v. Doles, 438 U. S. one hundred ninety (1978); see also Presley v. Etowah County Comm n, 502 U. S. 491 (1992); Voinovich v. Quilter, 507 U. S. 146 (1993); Growe v. Emison,


    965

    507 U. S. 25 (1993); City of Lockhart v. United States, 460 U. S. one hundred twenty five (1983).

    The large variety of choices that we would should overrule or reconsider, in addition to the congressional reenactments discussed above, suggests that JUSTICE THOMAS radical reinterpretation of the Voting Rights Act is barred with the aid of the well-installed precept that stare decisis has unique force in the statutory area. Ankenbrandt v. Richards, 504 U. S. 689, 700 (1992); Patterson v. McLean Credit Union, 491 U. S. 164, 171-172 (1989); Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, 431 U. S. 720, 736-737 (1977).

    JUSTICE THOMAS tries to reduce the unconventional implications of his interpretation of the phrase "balloting qualification ... popular, exercise, or technique" by way of noting that this example involves handiest the interpretation of § 2 of the Voting Rights Act. Section five, he tips, is probably interpreted otherwise. Even limiting the reinterpretation to § 2 cases, however, could require overruling a giant quantity of this Court s precedents. Houston Lawyers Assn. v. Lawyer General of Tex., 501 U. S. 419 (1991); Chisom v. Roemer, 501 U. S. 380 (1991); Thornburg v. Gingles, 478 U. S. 30 (1986); see additionally Voinovich v. Quilter, 507 U. S. 146 (1993); Growe v. Emison, 507 U. S. 25 (1993). In addition, a distinction among §§ 2 and five is difficult to rectangular with the language of the statute. Sections 2 and 5 include precisely the identical phrases: "balloting qualification ... wellknown, practice, or process." If anything, the wording of § five is narrower, as it provides the proscribing word "with admire to voting" after the phrase "procedure." Moreover, while Congress amended the Voting Rights Act in 1982 in response to Bolden, it amended § 2. As stated above, in those amendments Congress truely encouraged the utility of the Voting Rights Act to vote dilution claims. While a distinction among §§ 2 and 5 is probably supportable on policy grounds, it is an unusual distinction for devotees of "simple language" interpretation.


    966

    Opinion of STEVENS, J.

    Throughout his opinion, JUSTICE THOMAS argues that this case is an exception to stare decisis, because Allen and its progeny have "immersed the federal courts in a hopeless mission of weighing questions of political idea." Ante, at 892. There is not any query that the Voting Rights Act has required the courts to clear up difficult questions, however this is no reason to deviate from an interpretation that Congress has three times approved. Statutes regularly require courts to make policy judgments. The Sherman Act, as an instance, requires courts to delve deeply into the idea of financial organisation. Similarly, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act has required the courts to formulate a concept of identical opportunity. Our paintings could truly be an awful lot simpler if each case could be resolved through consulting a dictionary, but when Congress has legislated in general terms, judges might not invoke judicial modesty to avoid difficult questions.

    III

    When a statute has been authoritatively, again and again, and constantly construed for extra than 1 / 4 century, and when Congress has reenacted and prolonged the statute numerous times with complete recognition of that creation, judges have an mainly clean obligation to obey settled law. Whether JUSTICE THOMAS is correct that the Court s settled construction of the Voting Rights Act has been "a disastrous misadventure," ante, at 893, should no longer affect the choice in this case. It is therefore inappropriate for me to comment on the portions of his opinion which can be fine defined as an issue that the statute be repealed or amended in important respects.

    Oral Argument - October 04, 1993
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